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THE COMPETITIVE EQUESTRIAN
January/February 2017 Issue 8
U.S. and International Communications from the Hunter, Jumper and Dressage Arenas of Your Sport
Nationwide
Washington International Horse Show
U.S. Dressage Finals
Las Vegas National
Del Mar International
Sacramento International
Central California Classics
Sonoma Horse Park
Photograph Alden Corrigan Media
Your Sport
Your News
Your Business
International
The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair
Rider Review
Christian Heineking
Nayal Nassar
Richard Spooner
Julia Tops
Tom Murray
Wishing You a Happy New Year
OSPHOS
®
(clodronate injection)
Bisphosphonate
For use in horses only.
Brief Summary (For Full Prescribing Information, see package
insert)
CAUTION: Federal (USA) law restricts this drug to use by or on
the order of a licensed veterinarian.
DESCRIPTION: Clodronate disodium is a non-amino, chloro-
containing bisphosphonate. Chemically, clodronate disodium is
(dichloromethylene) diphosphonic acid disodium salt and is
manufactured from the tetrahydrate form.
INDICATION: For the control of clinical signs associated with
navicular syndrome in horses.
CONTRAINDICATIONS: Horses with hypersensitivity to clodronate
disodium should not receive OSPHOS.
WARNINGS: Do not use in horses intended for human consumption.
HUMAN WARNINGS: Not for human use. Keep this and all drugs
out of the reach of children. Consult a physician in case of acci-
dental human exposure.
PRECAUTIONS: As a class, bisphosphonates may be associ-
ated with gastrointestinal and renal toxicity. Sensitivity to drug
associated adverse reactions varies with the individual patient.
Renal and gastrointestinal adverse reactions may be associated
with plasma concentrations of the drug. Bisphosphonates are
excreted by the kidney; therefore, conditions causing renal im-
pairment may increase plasma bisphosphonate concentrations
resulting in an increased risk for adverse reactions. Concurrent
administration of other potentially nephrotoxic drugs should be
approached with caution and renal function should be mon-
itored. Use of bisphosphonates in patients with conditions or
diseases affecting renal function is not recommended.
Administration of bisphosphonates has been associated
with abdominal pain (colic), discomfort, and agitation in horses.
Clinical signs usually occur shortly after drug administration and
may be associated with alterations in intestinal motility. In horses
treated with OSPHOS these clinical signs usually began within
2 hours of treatment. Horses should be monitored for at least 2
hours following administration of OSPHOS.
Bisphosphonates affect plasma concentrations of some min-
erals and electrolytes such as calcium, magnesium and po-
tassium, immediately post-treatment, with effects lasting up
to several hours. Caution should be used when administering
bisphosphonates to horses with conditions affecting mineral or
electrolyte homeostasis (e.g. hyperkalemic periodic paralysis,
hypocalcemia, etc.).
The safe use of OSPHOS has not been evaluated in horses less
than 4 years of age. The effect of bisphosphonates on the skel-
eton of growing horses has not been studied; however, bisphos-
phonates inhibit osteoclast activity which impacts bone turnover
and may affect bone growth.
Bisphosphonates should not be used in pregnant or lactating
mares, or mares intended for breeding. The safe use of OSPHOS
has not been evaluated in breeding horses or pregnant or lac-
tating mares. Bisphosphonates are incorporated into the bone
matrix, from where they are gradually released over periods of
months to years. The extent of bisphosphonate incorporation
into adult bone, and hence, the amount available for release
back into the systemic circulation, is directly related to the to-
tal dose and duration of bisphosphonate use. Bisphosphonates
have been shown to cause fetal developmental abnormalities
in laboratory animals. The uptake of bisphosphonates into fetal
bone may be greater than into maternal bone creating a possible
risk for skeletal or other abnormalities in the fetus. Many drugs,
including bisphosphonates, may be excreted in milk and may be
absorbed by nursing animals.
Increased bone fragility has been observed in animals treated
with bisphosphonates at high doses or for long periods of time.
Bisphosphonates inhibit bone resorption and decrease bone
turnover which may lead to an inability to repair micro damage
within the bone. In humans, atypical femur fractures have been
reported in patients on long term bisphosphonate therapy; how-
ever, a causal relationship has not been established.
ADVERSE REACTIONS: The most common adverse reactions
reported in the field study were clinical signs of discomfort or
nervousness, colic and/or pawing. Other signs reported were
lip licking, yawning, head shaking, injection site swelling, and
hives/pruritus.
Distributed by: Dechra Veterinary Products
7015 College Boulevard, Suite 525
Overland Park, KS 66211 866-933-2472
© 2016 Dechra Ltd. OSPHOS is a registered
trademark of Dechra Ltd. All rights reserved.
NADA 141-427, Approved by FDA
OSPHOS
®
controls the
clinical signs
associated
with
Navicular
Syndrome
Learn more online
www.dechra-us.com
www.osphos.com
Easily Administered
via intramuscular injection
Well Tolerated*
in clinical trials
Proven Efficacy*
at 6 months post treatment
No Reconstitution
Required
As with all drugs, side effects may occur. In field studies, the most common side effects reported were signs
of discomfort or nervousness, colic, and/or pawing. OSPHOS should not be used in pregnant or lactating mares,
or mares intended for breeding. Use of OSPHOS in patients with conditions affecting renal function or mineral
or electrolyte homeostasis is not recommended. Refer to the prescribing information for complete details or
visit www.dechra-us.com or call 866.933.2472.
* Freedom of Information Summary, Original New Animal Drug Application, NADA 141-427, for OSPHOS. April 28, 2014.
Dechra Veterinary Products US and the Dechra D logo are registered trademarks of Dechra Pharmaceuticals PLC. © 2016 Dechra Ltd.
CAUTION: Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of licensed veterinarian.
Osphos_ad_dual_dressage_CompEQ.indd 1 12/2/16 8:41 AM
YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
Service Section
Contributing Writers
ANNE KURSINSKI
MACELLA O’NEILL
JACKIE MCFARLANE
DANIELLE BALLARD
BARBARA PINNELLA,
LINDSAY BROCK
EMILY RIDEN
Contributing Photographers
ALDEN CORRIGAN MEDIA
MARY CORNELIUS
DEB DAWSON
JULIE WARD
SHAWN MCMILLEN
Editor
LORNA LOWRIE
Submissions:
Magazines will gladly consider all articles, news, letters, and photographs for publication, but assumes no responsibility for unsolicited
material. Submissions may be edited. Congratulations and News & Reviews items are published free of charge. Letters are assumed publishable unless
we are advised otherwise. All submissions should meet our ad deadline to facilitate inclusion in next issue.
32 WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL HORSE SHOW
40 LAS VEGAS NATIONAL
56 SACRAMENTO INTERNATIONAL
57 DEL MAR INTERNATIONAL
60 CENTRAL CALIFORNIA FALL CLASSIC
61 CENTRAL CALIFORNIA OAK TREE CLASSIC
72 THE ROYAL HORSE SHOW
Club News
82 EQUESTRIANS INSTITUTE
84 OREGON DRESSAGE SOCIETY
87 OREGON HUNTER JUMPER ASSOCIATION
88 OREGON REGION U.S. PONY CLUB
90 WOODBROOK HUNT CLUB
89 WASHINGTON STATE HUNTER JUMPER
ASSOCIATION
92 U.S. EVENTING ASSOCIATION AREA VII
4 C
ONGRATULATIONS
97 TRAINER DIRECTORY
107 SERVICES DIRECTORY
128 ADVERTISERS
14 Tom Murray - USDF
Dressage Finals
28 Dressage Training
Pyramid
with Greg Franklin
34 Julia Tops
40 There is Something
About the Irish
64 Froley / Sereni Wedding
66 O3 Animal Health - Tips
67 Building Your Team -
with Anne Kursinski
68 Equis Style
78 Palm Beach Equine Clinic
© 2016 by Silver Oaks Marketing LLC, all rights reserved. This publication may not be reproduced or quoted in whole or in part by any means, printed or electronic,
without the written consent of the publisher. Not responsible for replacing issues not delivered due to address changes received after mailing date.
Publisher
Flying Changes &
The Competitive Equestrian
Lorna Lowrie
Silver Oaks Marketing LLC &
Equestrian Communications USA LLC
Editor@TheCompetitiveEquestrian.com
Mail@FlyingChanges.com
503 317 4956
Show News Features & Articles
CONTENTS
2017
January / February Issue 9
FLYING CHANGES
January 2017 Vol. XXIIV, No.1
The Competitive Equestrian
Margie Engle and Royce. Photograph by ©Alden Corrigan Media
20 ACRE RETREAT IN DUVALL
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ONE-OF-A-KIND EQUESTRIAN FIND ON SHY 5-ACRES
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maria@mariada nieli.com
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COUNTRY ESTATES EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES ACREAGE HOMES SINCE 1990
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Margie Engle and Royce. Photograph by ©Alden Corrigan Media
YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
Congratulations
NEW EQUINE & EQUESTRIAN PARTNERSHIP MARKET PLACE ANNOUNCEMENTS
Alvarez L
Elizabeth Nevins of Sammamish, WA
leased ALVAREZ L, owned by Constance
Sellman of Honeoye Falls, NY. Quinn
Partridge of Thumbs Up Farm and Stacia
Madden of Beacon Hill Show Stables
were the agents on the lease.
To place your congratulations or new
equine partnerships - just email...
mail@flyingchanges.com or
editor@thecompetitiveequestrian.com
It is free to place your sales and lease news in
Market Place. Thank you.
Happy New Year
"What are you excited about for 2017?" asks Macella O'Neill
Y
ou know you're a lucky person when you find yourself
excited about pretty much every upcoming year and
when you are surrounded by people that feel the same
way...
Buddy Brown is really looking forward to seeing what his
young horse Harry will be able to do in the show ring this
upcoming year as well as being excited about his clients and
their new horses.
Tammy Chipko just can't wait to get back in the show ring on
her beloved Mini-Coop
Dr Lori Bidwell had the perfect one word response " jumping"!
Susie Hutchison is hoping for a new Grand Prix horse
Kristen Hardin is looking forward to her homebred youngsters
finally making their show ring debut.
Gay Talmey ,long time Californian professional, now makes
her home in Tennessee and sent an inspirational and touching
response to my query, in addition to enjoying meeting a whole
new group of professionals and working and showing at lots
of new facilities, she remains delighted by and devoted to her
riding at 76, showing her homebred favorite Willie in the 1.15s,
fox hunting avidly on his brother Tony and starting a fancy
baby girl she bred in the Pre-Green this year.
Bill Madden, Brookside Equestrian Park owner, will be
introducing an expresso bar with homemade bakery items,
which is joyful news for me!
Barb Blasko, successful amateur jumper rider and the founder
of E-Vet the electronic vaccinations record system; in addition
to sponsoring the Sat class at HITS Coachella, is also going to
offer E-Vet service for free in 2017 in an effort to get everyone
enrolled in this ecient system.
Nicki Wilcox, young Colorado professional, has just about
completed construction of her very own facility complete with
an indoor ring.
Caroline Asbell, another young professional, left California
to return to her native Monroe, Washington where she has
established her own Highrock Equestrian business that is
already going strong.
Brian Wee, East Bay professional and 4 star trailer dealer, is
awaiting the arrival of his first baby.
Kelly La Fond a Woodside professional says that, "firsts"be it
lessons or competitions are the most meaningful moments for
her.
Ben Hay is excited to be headed to Europe next year and a
chance to go to several famous shows there.
Gry McFarlane is going to Africa, touring in both Kenya and
Tanzania with several ladies from her barn on the "trip of a
lifetime", while her son Ian will be heading to Florida with
Andrew Ramsey.
Amy Hansen and family spent a couple weeks in Tahiti and Bora
Bora for the holidays.
Peter McGregor and Lauren Wasserman are supplementing their
annual return to Peter's native Australia with some South Pacific
cruising!
Robert and Tammy Blanchette spent the holidays in Europe,
mixing business with pleasure.
Jenni Martin McAllister is looking forward to the 2017 World
Cup Final hopefully as a competitor! and is excited for us to
have such a competition happening in the mid west for the 1st
time. She is also looking forward to seeing the progression of
our sport. Things are changing slowly, but it seems to me that
we are moving in the right direction. Adding programs for young
jumper riders and developing a 'pathway' for riders and horses to
compete at the top of our sport.
Colin and Toni McIntosh returned from a European sojourn just
in time for Christmas.
Mary Anguiamo, Ranch Polo manager is planning on enjoying
her lovely mare and the "season"
Nicole Bloom is looking forward to growing, learning and
appreciating.
Sue Lightner has several students with exciting and ambitious
goals and is hoping to squeeze a bit more judging and a few more
clinics herself as well as carving out some personal time this
upcoming year.
Bless the hard working and devoted Lorna Lowrie who makes
this magazine possible, as she hopes to have more time to
promote and develop this sport we all love.
And here's a direct quote from Gaby Salick that seems like a
perfect way to conclude:
"I never imagined that I would enjoy aging in this sport, and the
changes that come with time, circumstances and experience. But
each year when these changes occur, wanted or unwanted, I find
that my love for horses and for our beautiful life with them becomes
deeper. I can't wait to see what 2017 brings!"
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS
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Congratulations
NEW EQUINE & EQUESTRIAN PARTNERSHIP MARKET PLACE ANNOUNCEMENTS
YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
NEWS & Reviews
USHJA
eLexington, Ky. Dec. 20, 2016
e United States Hunter Jumper
Association has made key changes to its
International Hunter Derby, National
Hunter Derby and World Championship
Hunter Rider programs that took eect
December 1, 2016. At the same time,
USHJA has created USHJA Hunter
sections at fence heights from 2’0” to 3’0”
that are open to all competitors for the
2017 competition year. ese changes
A
C
H
E
K
M
B
F
aim to increase participation and value for
members.
New USHJA Hunter sections are
designed to provide competitors with an
opportunity to earn Zone Horse of the Year
or Stirrup Cup points in typically unrated,
open sections with fence heights of 2’0”,
2’3”, 2’6”, 2’9” or 3’0”. Competitions may
oer any number of these sections. Each
section must oer between, three and ve
classes with one of those classes designated
as an under saddle. e sections are open
to all competitors riding horses or ponies.
e USHJA International Hunter Derby
will expand the popular Rider Ranking
System used during the International
Hunter Derby Championships as
an option for competition managers
to award additional prize money at
competitions throughout the series. e
Rider Ranking System organizes riders
based on their ranking on their earnings
in USHJA International Hunter Derbies
over the last three years. Riders ranked
40th or higher on the 3-Year Money-
Won list are considered Tier I, and all
other riders are considered Tier II.
Additionally, riders in USHJA
International Hunter Derbies are now
limited to competing no more than
four horses in each class. A competition
may choose to further limit the number
of horses a rider may compete to three
horses, as long as the competition noties
the USHJA 60 days in advance of the
date of the class and such limitation is
printed in the prize list.
Beginning in 2017, the USHJA
National Hunter Derby may be split into
two separate sections (one open and one
Junior/Amateur per the specications)
at the discretion of competition
management when there are 40 or
more entries. Money and points won
in the USHJA National Hunter Derby
will only be awarded toward a declared
Hunter section for Horse of the Year
points if a horse competes in the declared
section a minimum of one time during
the competition year. Additionally, now
competition managers have the option of
having one or two panels of judges.
In 2017 the World Championship
Hunter Rider Program will include the
new Young Hunters 3’0”, 3’3 and 3’6 as
recommended sections. Points garnered
in the Young Hunter 3’0” and 3’3
sections will count toward Developing
Professional awards, and Young Hunters
3’6 points will count toward Professional
awards. e WCHR program will
also align its green sections with the
new Green Hunter naming structure,
adjusting sections as follows: First Year
Green is now Green Hunter 3’6”; Second
Year Green is now Green Hunter 3’9”;
and Regular Conformation Hunter is
now High Performance Conformation
Hunter.
For more information about USHJA
programs, visit www.ushja.org/programs.
Olson
s Tack
www.OlsonsTack.com
425.454.9453
Winter Clearance Sale
JANUARY 20th – 22nd
Thank you for celebrating the
Northwest equestrian community
by shopping locally.
Winter
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25
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Winter
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YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
HORSE Tales
Legolas Named Adequan®
USDF Grand Prix Horse of the
Year
Lexington, KY (December 9, 2016)
e United States Dressage Federation
(USDF) would like to congratulate the fourteen
-year-old, 17.0 hand, Westfalen gelding, Legolas,
owned by Akiko Yamazakis Four Winds Farm
LLC, and ridden by Steen Peters of San Diego,
California, for being named 2016 Adequan®/
USDF Grand Prix Horse of the Year. Legolas’
median score of 77.160 percent made him the
top horse in the United States competing at this
level and the recipient of USDFs highest honor
for the fth year in a row.
Legolas was recognized at the 2016 Adequan®/
Space reserved for
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It takes an understanding of the dynamics of a specialty horse
property. That’s why I’d like to share my real estate, equestrian
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and, best of all, a seamless experience. Whether buying or
selling, Tenhulzen Real Estate is here for you.
For more information,
please contact:
Kimberly Crouse Tenhulzen
206.409.0771
Kimberly@TenhulzenRE.com
www.tenhulzenrealestate.com
Tenhulzen Real Estate
11000 151st Avenue NE, Redmond, WA 98052
ther buying or
It takes an understanding of the dynamics of a specialty horse
property. That’s why I’d like to share my real estate, equestrian
and training background to finding the perfect fit. By discuss-
ing property values, selling points, and preparing your home
for sale, we’ll see a shorter time on the market, greater value
and, best of all, a seamless experience. Whether buying or
selling, Tenhulzen Real Estate is here for you.
For more information,
please contact:
Kimberly Crouse Tenhulzen
206.409.0771
Kimberly@TenhulzenRE.com
www.tenhulzenrealestate.com
Tenhulzen Real Estate
11000 151st Avenue NE, Redmond, WA 98052
ther buying or
selling, Tenhulzen Real Estate is here for you.
It takes an understanding of the dynamics
of a specialty horse property. That’s why
I’d like to share my real estate, equestrian
and training background for nding the
perfect t. By discussing property values,
selling points, and preparing your home for
sale, we’ll see a shorter time on the market,
greater value and best of all, a seamless
experience.
Whether buying or selling
Tenhulzen Real Estate is here for you
FlyingChanges20161221OL.pdf 1 12/21/16 9:46:36 AM
USDF Salute Gala and Annual Awards Banquet
with a commemorative personalized plaque,
an embroidered cooler, and a gift certicate
provided by Dressage Extensions. Also, Legolas
is the recipient of the Colonel ackeray
Award and will have his name engraved on
a silver trophy to be on permanent display in
the Roemer Foundation/USDF Hall of Fame
housed at the USDF National Education
Center, located at the Kentucky Horse Park.
“USDF is thrilled to be able to recognize
this extraordinary horse for his many
accomplishments during the 2016 competition
season. We also congratulate his owner Four
Winds Farm, Akiko Yamazaki, his rider Steen
Peters, and the entire Legolas team, stated
USDF Executive Director Stephan Hienzsch.
For more information about the Adequan®/
USDF Horse of the Year awards or to access
a list of past and current recipients, visit the
USDF website at www.usdf.org, or contact the
USDF oce at usdressage@usdf.org.
USDF Congratulates New L
Education Program Graduates
Lexington, KY (December 9, 2016)
e United States Dressage Federation
(USDF) is pleased to announce that thirteen
USDF members successfully graduated
from the USDF L Education Program (L
Program) in 2016. is program is designed to
prepare candidates to enter the United States
Equestrian Federation (USEF) “r” Judges
Training Program, to qualify individuals to
judge schooling shows, and to give competitors,
trainers, and instructors greater insight into
the evaluative process of judging dressage.
e program also serves to provide continuing
education for licensed judges. e L Program is
an excellent opportunity for all USDF members
to learn how to improve their scores and
improve their ability to view other rides from
a judge’s perspective, whether or not they plan
on becoming licensed judges themselves. USDF
L Program faculty are approved USEF Senior
(“S”) dressage judges, who have experience in
teaching judge-training programs.
USDF congratulates our 2016 graduates:
Region 1:
*Stephanie Burgess
Region 2:
* Megan Dischler
* Clara Etzel
Region 5:
Carole Haney
Region 6:
* Nicol Hinde
* Garyn Heidemann
* Lisa Weis
Region 7:
*Kalli Bowles
Mary Duy
*Janelle Dunn
*Alexis Martin-Vegue
*Ruth Shirkey
Region 9:
*Kristin Currie
*Denotes those that graduated with distinction
from the L Program. ose who pass with
distinction are eligible to apply to enter the
USEF recorded (‘r’) judge program.
For more information about the USDF L
Education Program, to access a list of USDF
L graduates, for a calendar of USDF L
Education Programs, or for details on hosting
an L Education Program, visit www.usdf.org or
contact USDF at lprogram@usdf.org.
FlyingChanges20161221OL.pdf 1 12/21/16 9:46:36 AM
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W
hen Tom Murray and his partner Steven Schachter moved up to Canby, Oregon last year
to start their professional dressage and Hanoverian breeding business, they brought along
Tom’s eight-year-old Dutch Warmblood, Balanchine. At that time, he was just learning to do a single
change of lead.
By March, he made his debut in Prix St. George and by the end of the year, he qualified for the U.S.
Finals in Lexington, Kentucky.
“Mr. B. loves his job and loves to learn. It’s
amazing how quickly he catches on. He is the
greatest horse I’ve ever partnered with.”
First Year at Prix St. George,
Balanchine Takes Tom Murray
to U.S. Dressage Finals
By Barbara Pinnella
Top Left: Tom and daughter Kelley
Bottom Left: Alltech Arena
Center Top: Tom Murray and Balanchine
Center Bottom: Tom at gateway to
Kentucky Horse Park
Right: Tom and Balanchine
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
On November 5
th
, with the help of sponsors and friends and the
Region 6 Travel Fund, Tom and Mr. B. set out for Kentucky with
Brooke Voldbaek and her mare, Dimora. Brooke had been Tom’s
first coach when he arrived in Portland and it was very exciting
for him to be able to make the trip with her and her husband,
Don Powers as colleagues.
After four grueling 14-hour driving days, they arrived at
Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington.
“The facility was breathtaking,” Tom said. “The Alltech Arena was
enormous and impressive – there were numerous museums and
exhibits and restaurants. Everything was perfectly suited for this
event (as well as Rolex), and credit goes to the State of Kentucky
for providing this facility for the equestrian community. I wish the
State of Oregon had something of this caliber.”
The night before his first class however, Tom got some bad
news. I received a call from my partner Steven that his mother was
dying. I wanted to be there with them, but there was no possible way
– and thankfully, he understood.”
The next morning, Tom dedicated his ride at Prix St. George to
Stevens mother – and he won the class.
As luck would have it, on day two and with temperatures
plunging to 28 degrees, Tom was the first 8 a.m. go.
“I’m from California. My hands were frozen to the reins and
certainly Mr. B. had never ridden in that type of weather. But it
energized him and he was just phenomenal to ride the Intermediare
1 test.”
They took second place and Toms daughter, who flew from
California to groom for him, recorded it live on Facebook
complete with commentary – The “Kelley Cam”.
“I think Kelley found a new profession, though she is also a fabulous
E.R. nurse,” Tom said proudly.
Day three was the U.S. finals Prix St. George championship in
the intimidating Alltech Arena. “We were up against 16 of the
best Prix St. George riders in the country and I was excited to
get out there and show what this horse can do. We had a great
ride. He was unfazed by the scale of the arena and I really felt he
clicked into it and understood what he was there for. He gave his
all – and I was so proud of him.”
With a score of 65.8 and three judges, they placed 9
th
and Tom
was thrilled. Balanchine and Tom are now preparing for the
CDIs down in Southern California and the small tour, which is
Prix St. Georges, Intermediare 1 and the Intermediare 1 freestyle.
Tom and Steven have just completed the construction of their
new covered arena at Viola Farm in Canby and that came just
in time to practice for their March CDI debut in Burbank and
Del Mar, CA. Tom is also excited about opening his Dressage
Training business with 12 new oversized stalls attached to the
arena, and will be giving his first introduction clinic in February.
Balanchine is only eight years old and Tom has done all of the
work on him himself. “We found him in a backyard as a green
broke five-year-old and he was learning to be a western pleasure
horse, but his aptitude for dressage is off the chart.”
Tom has high hopes that this horse can take them to
International competition. It will be exciting to follow their
journey together.
Arriving at Kentucky Horse Park
Tom Murray and Balanchine
Tom Murray and Balanchine - Intermediare 1 Test
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
I was lucky to have an Incredible
eventing season.
Thanks to:
Jill for convincing me to buy Cisco and her
talent as an instructor
Anne Montgomery for tuning-up Cisco
while I was sick
The Clover Valley Gang, Candace, Varonica,
Ruth, Klara, Julie and Cheryl
Dee Cee Woods my generous friend and
eventing partner
And my support team Jerome Geissler,
Marney McGovern, Christine Regan
BIG thanks to my amazing horse Cisco
All of you made it possible for me to:
Win Whidbey Island and EI Horse Trails
Be rated by the US Eventing Association
as 7th in the country Master (over 40)
Adult Rider in Beginner Novice
Thank You
Jill Seely
Clover Valley
Riding Center!
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 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
8 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS January 2017
CONGRATULATIONS EMILY
Wishing you a great 2017 Season
Wacky Nut Farm
wishes to congratulate
our trainer, Emily
Sorensen, on a fabulous
2016 show season!
Region 6 Reserve
Champion at 4th Level,
and an impressive
performance at USDF
National Championships
in Kentucky.
We are so proud of you!
www.WackyNutFarm.com
F
or one week each October, the Penn Quarter neighborhood
around Verizon Center in Washington, D.C., transforms into
a festival of horses. Streets close for stabling and community
events, and pedestrians and vehicles make way for hundreds of horses
to compete at the Washington International Horse Show (WIHS), one
of the most prestigious and engaging equestrian events in the country,
and a D.C. tradition since 1958.
In October, WIHS wrapped its 58th year with one of the most
successful events in its history. The show hosted business, military,
and diplomatic leaders, local and military charities, community
events, and more than 26,000 fans of all ages, making it one of the
largest indoor equestrian events in the United States.
President’s Cup Night: Celebrating Equestrian Stars
On Saturday night, WIHS celebrated the best horses and riders in the
world. Saturday night’s $130,000 Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping
Washington, presented by Events DC, brought out a star-studded line-
up of top international show jumpers to take on the biggest jumps and
most challenging course of the week. The competition also awarded
the famed President of the United States Perpetual Cup, donated to
the show by First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy in 1961.
U.S. show jumpers Lauren Hough, Laura Kraut and Kent Farrington
finished in the top three following a thrilling jump-off, with Hough and
Ohlala taking the victory, Kraut and Confu, second, and Farrington
aboard Creedance, third.
Course designer Alan Wade (IRL) saw 28 starters over his first-
round course, with seven advancing to the jump-off and two double
clear rounds in the race against the clock. Carrying on their winning
momentum from Thursday’s $35,000 International Jumper Welcome
Stake, presented by CMJ Sporthorse, Hough and Ohlala earned
another exciting victory.
“She was incredible the whole week,” said Hough of the 12-year-old
Swedish Warmblood mare (Orlando x Cardento) owned by The Ohlala
Group. “Thursday was a really nice warm-up for her. All the stars were
lined up for me this week, so Im thrilled.”
Junior Riders Shine in WIHS Equitation Finals
Champions of tomorrow are often found in the ranks of the WIHS
Equitation Finals. This prestigious year-end championship for junior
riders is a touchstone for future international equestrian stars.
Forty of the nations top junior riders qualified to compete in this
year’s championship, which is held over three phases of competition.
Riders jumped a hunter course on Friday, a jumper course on Saturday
afternoon, with the top 10 returning Saturday night for a final work-
off where they switched horses and jumped the same course one more
time.
It was Hunter Holloway, 18, of Topeka, Kan., who led through the
three phases to win this year’s WIHS Equitation Finals. Madison
Goetzmann finished second and Lucy Deslauriers, third.
George Morris, one of four judges with Rob Bielefeld, Kitty Barker
and Danny Robertshaw, remarked on the class and Holloway’s winning
characteristics.
“It was excellent. I was very honored to be asked to judge,” said
Morris. “At the top of these finals, it is always incredible (to see the
rider) position, the use of aids, and the execution. It is very important
when you are judging to judge what you see and be as objective as
possible. Hunter’s basics are so correct. The top ten were wonderful,
but she won the class.”
Special Team USA Recognition
WIHS saluted Team USA for its outstanding performance at the 2016
Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, winning medals in all three
equestrian disciplines—individual bronze in Eventing, team bronze in
Dressage, and team silver in jumping.
A special ceremony was also held to induct equestrian legend Frank
Shines in the City
By Lauren Fisher
Lauren Hough and Ohlala, winners of the $130,000 Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping
Washington, presented by Events DC. Photo by Shawn McMillen Photography
Chapot into the WIHS Hall of Fame. Chapot, who passed away in June
at age 84, leaves an enduring legacy of horsemanship and patriotism
in the sport of show jumping. His relationship with WIHS spanned its
58-year history, as he was the first rider to win the grand prix (prior to
it becoming the President’s Cup in 1961) in 1958, then went on to win
it again in 1965. The Olympic medalist, rider, chef d’equipe, trainer and
breeder of champions became the 12th inductee into the WIHS Hall
of Fame.
Military Night: Honor, Power and Speed
Friday’s Military Night, presented by The Boeing Company, was all
about power and speed. The $25,000 Puissance high jump competition,
presented by The Boeing Company, is a WIHS fan favorite as horses
and riders take on the great wall in an extraordinary display of power
and courage. Six horses and riders attempted the impressive wall
this year, and USAs McLain Ward and Aaron Vale tied for first place
jumping clear for five rounds to a height of 7’.
Vale rode Thinks Like a Horse and Don Stewart’s Finou 4, and McLain
Ward was aboard his own ZZ Top v/h Schaarbroek Z. They are two
veterans of Puissance competition, with Ward having won this class
seven times, and Vale twice.
Friday’s $50,000 GE International Speed Final was won by Amanda
Derbyshire (GBR) riding David Gochmans Luibanta BH. The pair was
first to go, and cleared Alan Wade’s (IRL) speed course in a time of 54.72
seconds that held on through 21 rounds for the win over McLain Ward
(USA) and his own Malou, and Jessica Springsteen (USA) aboard the
always speedy Stone Hill Farm’s Davendy S.
Barn Night: Costumes, Contests and Camaraderie
Held on Thursday, WIHS Barn Night, presented by Dover Saddlery with
the generous support of The Peterson Family Foundation and National
Harbor, is a favorite with young riders and horse lovers of all ages who
attend in groups and have a chance to enter contests, win big prizes,
and enjoy a fun, horse-filled evening. Almost two thousand children
representing 64 regional barns and groups were among the spectators
watching the $35,000 International Jumper Accumulator Costume class
presented by The Gochman Family, with riders and horses decked out
in Halloween attire.
Laura Kraut (dressed as Little Red Riding Hood) and Stars and Stripes’
Andretti S won the competition. The pair cleared the course and the
high side of the joker fence for a 65-point total in the fastest time of
44.47 seconds.
Also on a perfect score of 65 riding Eagle Valley Partners LLC’s Ciana,
Andrew Kocher (USA) finished fourth with a time of 51.63 seconds,
but won the Best Costume Award, presented by Equestrian Sport
Productions, for their impressive clown attire.
2016 WIHS Equitation Finals winner Hunter Holloway and Any Given Sunday with trainer Don
Stewart. Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Beezie Madden, McLain Ward, Laura Kraut, Kent Farrington, and U.S. Show Jumping Team chef
d’equipe Robert Ridland in a special ceremony honoring the 2016 Olympians. Photo by Alden
Corrigan Media
Aaron Vale riding Finou 4, and McLain Ward aboard ZZ Top v/h Schaarbroek Z, tied for
rst place in the $25,000 International Jumper Puissance, presented by The Boeing
Company. Photo by Shawn McMillen Photography
Laura Kraut (dressed as Little Red Riding Hood) and Andretti S topped the $35,000
International Jumper Accumulator costume class, presented by The Gochman Family.
Photo by Shawn McMillen Photography
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Sophie Gochman and Storyteller came out on top in the WIHS Pony
Equitation Finals. Last year it was Sophie’s sister, Mimi, who rode
Storyteller to win the same class. Storyteller also won the 2016 Grand
Pony Hunter Championship with Mimi this year. Emily Aitken was
named 2016 Best Child Rider on a Pony.
WIHS Children’s and Adult Championships
Riders earning the most points in WIHS Championship classes held
throughout the country earned a place in the WIHS Finals at Verizon
Center where the ultimate champions were determined. The winner of
The wildly popular WIHS Shetland Pony Steeplechase Championship
Series, presented by Charles Owen, brought down the house again this
year. Additional activities included autograph signings with top riders,
a scavenger hunt, a tee-shirt toss plus a visit from Major, the WIHS
Mascot, and internet sensations Dally and Spanky.
Hunter Competition
Scott Stewart, of Wellington, Fla., earned the WIHS Leading Hunter
Rider title at this year’s WIHS after winning both the WIHS Grand
Hunter Championship and WIHS Grand Green Working Hunter
Championship aboard David Gochmans Catch Me. Gochman was also
presented an award as the Leading Hunter Owner. Stewart earned a
$5,000 bonus for the Leading Hunter Rider Award, sponsored by Dr.
Betsee Parker. It was fittingly renamed this year as The Scott Stewart
Leading Hunter Rider Award, for Stewart who has earned the title nine
times now in his great career.
Custom Made and Shaw Johnson Price earned the Amateur-Owner
Hunter 3’6” Grand Championship, and Carma and Virginia Fout won
the Amateur-Owner Hunter 3’3” Grand Championship. Price and Fout
were also named Leading Amateur-Owner Hunter Riders in their
respective divisions.
In the Junior Hunters, Annabel Revers and Beechwood Stables’
MTM Hands Down earned the Grand Championship sponsored by
Shamrock Ventures, and Revers was named Best Child Rider on a
Horse, sponsored by Gotham North.
Internet sensations Dally and Spanky perform with owner Francesca Carson.
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Grand Hunter Champion Catch Me with Leading Hunter Rider Scott Stewart.
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Mimi and Sophie Gochman say goodbye to their pony careers and Storyteller.
Photo by Jump Media
Custom Made and Shaw Johnson Price earned the Amateur-Owner Hunter 3’6” Grand
Championship. Photo by Shawn McMillen Photography
 WWW.THECOMPETITIVEEQUESTRIAN.COM 
the $10,000 WIHS Childrens Hunter Championship was Chapman,
owned and ridden by Kathryn Crenshaw. The $10,000 WIHS Adult
Hunter Championship was won by Contina, owned and ridden by
Jacquelyn Maggiore.
Top honors in the $10,000 WIHS Children’s Jumper Championship,
presented by The Klein Family & Lance Williamson Stables, went
to Sarah Boston riding her own Herminas. Dean Dignelli and
Heritage Farm, Inc.s Redefin won the $10,000 WIHS Adult Jumper
Championship, presented by The Treacy Family.
The Winner’s Circle
When all the numbers were tallied, WIHS presented 20 division
championships, 75 trophies, 1,200 ribbons, 53 embroidered
championship coolers from The Clothes Horse and more than half a
million dollars in prize money and rider bonuses.
WIHS thanks its dedicated sponsors, supporters and fans for making
the 58th year successful and special in the heart of the nations capital.
The 59th Annual Washington International Horse Show returns on
October 24-29, 2017, at Verizon Center in Washington, DC!
For more information, visit www.wihs.org.
Kathryn Crenshaw and Chapman won the $10,000 WIHS Children’s Hunter Championship.
Photo by Shawn McMillen Photography
Rollingwoods Knee Deep & Alexa Lignelli. Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Terry Konkle
(877) 254-5112
VISA & Mastercard Accepted
Look us up at
www.lightstarranch.com
SYCAMORE HORSE FARM
Want to buy an Irish horse but unsure where to start?
Scared of the perceived cost, or who to contact to source the right one?
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modern Showjumpers, and we can now oer you a full service turnkey experience to nd your next perfect horse.
Let the team who found and produced premier International showjumpers; WKD Pepperpot, Suma’s Zorro, WKD Diva, WKD
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International level, let us nd your next superstar.
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Working with us direct gives you more horse for your dollar!
Dreaming of Ireland?
“Take that flight, land on the awe inspiring Emerald Isle, and
take a drive through the rolling green fields to ride beautiful Irish
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International Airports at
Belfast and only 2 hours from
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We can arrange all travel
requirements both human and
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So contact us today for a chat
to see how we can make your
Irish dream a reality!
Contact
Joanne Sloan-Allen
+44 7722 537373
or
+44 7557 529569
Joanne.Allen@
SycamoreStables.com
Parkside Stables
Congratulations to all our clients on a successful 2016
Looking forward to a wonderful 2017!
Morgan Thomas
Nora Thomas
Tory bova
Barn: 425 885 5025
Cell: 206 669 5173
parksidestables@msn.com
13020 NE 39th Street
Bellevue WA 98005
www.parksidestables.com
(425) 760-8600
RAQUEL DAVA L O S | NANCY REILLY | HEIDI DAVA L O S
(425) 417-0024
(425) 870-3334
John L. Scott Woodinville| 17717 132nd Ave NE Woodinville, WA 98072
Client Success Comes First
Pending
Pending
Happy 2017! New year, new property?
Make this the year you find the property
of your dreams
Pending Active
(425) 760-8600
RAQUEL DAVA L O S | NANCY REILLY | HEIDI DAVA L O S
(425) 417-0024
(425) 870-3334
John L. Scott Woodinville| 17717 132nd Ave NE Woodinville, WA 98072
Client Success Comes First
Pending
Pending
Happy 2017! New year, new property?
Make this the year you find the property
of your dreams
Pending Active
Call to schedule a private tour or audit a lesson:
Contact Tom Murray: 626 644 3008 or tommurraydressage@gmail.com
www.tommurraydressage.com
TOM MURRAY DRESSAGE
Quality Riding Arena Bases & Surfaces
• 216’ x 80’ arena
• Equiloft footing
• 12’ x 14’ stalls
hot water wash racks
• 1st class dressage training
• Daily turnout
• Quality horse care
Active show schedule
• Private horse estate with pool
& tennis court
• 20 miles south of Portlan
d
Quality Riding Arena Bases & Surfaces
Proudly Announce
&
COMPLETION OF THE NEW COVERED ARENA!
ACCEPTING A LIMITED NUMBER OF DRESSAGE CLIENTS
28815 S. NEEDY RD. CANBY, OR 97013
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The DressageTraining
Pyramid to Develop
Hunters and
Jumpers
By Greg Franklin
F
or over 2,000 years, man has been riding horses and discovering techniques on how to train them. People have come
up with fantastic ideas, including inside leg to outside rein, figuring out that horses travel in a diagonal frame, and go
forward first. While I am sure there were plenty of ideas that did not work, one of the best that has been developed is
the Dressage Pyramid. This is a training tool with its roots in classical dressage.
I am a Hunter and Jumper trainer, and I frequently use the Dressage Pyramid in my training and lessons. It is a very basic
visual aid that can be used when schooling young horses, flatting a more experienced horse, or teaching all levels of riders from
beginner to advanced. We use this type of flatwork to help our horses become more elastic longitudinally (back to front) and
laterally (left to right). This helps to shift the horses weight from its front end to its back end, which in turn makes it easier for
the horse to jump. Also, with more elasticity, the horse becomes more rideable in between the jumps.
using cavaletti. At the trot, I set four cavaletti at 4’9” apart
so that the horse has to take two steps with its left legs and
two steps with its right legs. This is a comfortable distance
for most horses and allows the rider to establish a consistent
rhythm. At the canter, I start with the cavaletti at 9 feet
apart, so they are set up as a bounce to help develop the
horses canter. Once the horse does this well, I move them to
18 feet apart so the horse has to do one stride between each
of them.
Rhythm: This is the first building block of the pyramid.
At the walk, the horse has a natural four-beat rhythm. As the
horse walks, his head goes up and down, so the rider must
have an elastic elbow, and the hand must move forward
and back in time with the horses head. This also happens at
the canter, the difference being that the horse canters with
a three-beat rhythm. The trot has a two-beat rhythm, and
the horses head stays still, so there is no forward and back
movement with the hands. I like to work on this rhythm by
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
Canterbury Farm’s assistant trainer Caitlyn Shiels works on relaxation with her
mount. Photo by Andrew Ryback Photography

pyramid. Photo by Carasco Photography
Trotting or cantering cavaletti allows the horse and rider to establish a consistent
rhythm. Photo by Emily Riden
Relaxation: This is the second building block of the
triangle. It may be the most important, but one that is
skipped the most frequently. A relaxed horse is one that will
be a willing partner in what you ask of him, whether that be
going forward, collecting, or moving laterally. Elasticity and
suppleness are the keys here. The horse needs to be able to
demonstrate his adjustability by lengthening and collecting
his stride. This is known as longitudinal suppleness.
One exercise that I like to do is set up two cavaletti at 72 feet
apart. We first do this in a straight line, then set it up on a
bend and have the rider do six strides, and then add another
stride and do seven strides in between.
The horse also needs to be able to show his adjustability
laterally by bending his body and his neck. A horse with
lateral suppleness will bend around the rider’s legs through
his ribs. The first and most basic lateral movement is riding
a corner. This then naturally progresses to riding a circle
and continues on to leg yielding and shoulder-in. This is the
beginning of impulsion.
In leg yield and shoulder-in, we are working on using lateral
aids on the horse. Lateral aids is to say aids on the same
side, left rein and left leg for example. In leg yield, the rider
pushes the horse with left rein and leg to the right so that
the horse moves forward and laterally at the same time. The
horse will naturally cross the inside front leg in front of the
outside front leg. The same exercise can be done with the
right rein and right leg pushing the horse to the left.
In shoulder-in, the rider brings the outside front leg in and
places it in front of the inside hind leg. The horse is bent to
the inside at approximately a 30-degree angle. This position
creates three parallel tracks. Standing on the ground
observing, you will see the inside front leg on one track, the
inside hind leg and outside front leg on a separate track, and
the outside hind leg on a third parallel track.
Kathryn Berry demonstrates connection on Caitlyn Shiels’ Cavalier II.
Photo courtesy of Greg Franklin
About Greg Franklin
Greg Franklin is the head trainer at Canterbury Farm in Hampshire, IL.
For over 35 years, Franklin has ridden hunters and jumpers to numerous
championships nationally and has brought home numerous Zone 5
‘Horse of the Year’ awards. Franklin has qualied horses and riders for
the Pennsylvania National, Washington International and the National
Horse Shows including the Medal and Maclay Finals. He has also shown
internationally at Canada’s Spruce Meadows in the 1.40m and 1.45m
divisions and is a certied trainer with USHJA. Additionally, Franklin
holds his ‘R’ card in Hunters, Hunter Seat Equitation, and Jumpers,
and judges throughout the country. For more information, visit www.
canterburyfarmchicago.com.
Connection: This is the third level of the pyramid.
Basically, connection is the acceptance of contact through
the acceptance of the aids. By this point the horse has been
ridden forward so that it starts to seek the contact of the
hand. The horse will start to come round, with the poll
being the highest point of contact and the horses nose
slightly in front of the vertical. In self-carriage, the horse
has impulsion, a desire to go forward, is travelling straight,
the inside hind leg tracks behind the inside front leg (same
with the outside hind leg tracking behind the outside front
leg), the horses poll is just above the withers, and his nose
is slightly in front of the vertical. It is at this point that the
horse is carrying the rider and doing a majority of the work.
One must be very careful here so that you do not achieve
hyper flexion, which is where the horses nose comes behind
the vertical and gets behind the bridle. The rider must ride
with soft elastic arms and let the horse initiate the contact.
As horses become more advanced, their balance will change.
The young horse will start with a longer and lower balance,
and as he becomes more advanced, the balance will become
lighter in front.
Learn about the next three steps in the dressage pyramid
next issue! Greg will continue the discussion by breaking
down Impulsion, Straightness, and Collection.
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George Morris Clinic
George Morris Clinic
(Fri-Sat-Sun) May 19-20-21, 2017
Maggie
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(425) 882-3558 | Redmond, WA | facebook.com/potcreek
Trainer—Cara Anthony | Assistant—Mario Gamboa
Edelweiss
Sold in 2016
From Monroe, WA to the National Finals
Congratulations Maggie and Megan!
Megan
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in 2017
Pony Finals, NAJYRC Championships,
Prix dStates, WCE Finals, WIHS Finals,
USET Talent Search Finals, Maclay Finals,
USEF Medal Finals
2016 Gulliver Trophy
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I
f you’re looking to catch
up with Julia Tops this
time of year, you’re
just as likely to find
the young Canadian
equestrian seated at a desk
studying for class as you are
to find her in the saddle. And
you will need to be prepared to
squeeze into her busy schedule.
Julia
Tops
By Emily Riden/Jump Media
Successfully
Juggling
School and
Show Jumping
Canadian equestrian Julia Tops, 18, is a sophomore at the
University of Toronto where she is part of a highly-competitive
International Relations program.
Photo by Phil Crozier
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
While the 18-year-old may have riding in her
blood – she is the daughter of Dutch Olympic gold
medalist and Longines Global Champions Tour
(LGCT) founder Jan Tops and Canadian show
jumping team veteran Tani Zeidler - she also shares
her parents’ drive for success outside of the show
ring. It’s that drive for success that has gotten Tops
to where she is today: juggling horse showing with
her sophomore year at the University of Toronto,
where she is part of a highly-competitive program
specializing in International Relations.
Tops divided her summer between interning at
ATCO, founded by the late Ron Southern of Spruce
Meadows fame and now run by his daughter, Nancy
Southern, and competing throughout Europe and
North America on several mounts including Zamiro
16, acquired from fellow Canadian rider Kara Chad
and India Blue ZF, the first product of her family’s
breeding program at Zeidler Farm in Calgary, AB.
Come September, Tops was back at the University of
Toronto where her show ring accomplishments
are known by only a few close friends. Instead,
the majority of her fellow students know her as a
member of the Delta Delta Delta sorority, or as the
lead analyst for the G20 Research Group, dedicated to studying
the compliance to goals put in place at the annual G20 Summit.
“When I’m at school, Im friends with completely non-horse
people,” explained Tops. “The type of school I choose was for
academics, not for riding, so I don’t really know anyone whos in
the horse world like me.
“You can sometimes get so encapsulated in the horse world,”
continued Tops. “It can be really nice to have non-horse people
as friends to bring you back to reality in a sense.”
The balance of horsey and non-horsey friends bears a striking
resemblance to the balance that Tops has created between her
equestrian and non-equestrian activities, but she will be the first
to admit that it can be a dicult equilibrium to create.
“My biggest struggle is missing out on things or feeling like I’m
not in either place enough,” said Tops candidly. “I had to learn
to prioritize. I went into my first year with the mentality of ‘I
love riding, and Im going to leave at every opportunity I can to
go ride.’ I quickly learned that it’s okay to enjoy your first year.
Nothing is ever going to be like your first year of university
again. I’ve made such great friendships, and I have great
relationships with my professors. I joined a bunch of clubs. All
of that really builds your character and, in the end, helps you be
a better person mentally, and even with riding.”
Tops continued, “I had come in with a plan to attend about five
shows in Europe in my first semester, but physically I didn’t
find that possible. I found that I was doing a half-hearted job at
both, and that’s not my personality at all. I reorganized myself;
I showed a little bit less but when I went, I was competitive. I
was there to win. I found that way more rewarding than maybe
going seven weekends and being stressed about ‘I need to run
home and study, I need to hand this in’. I learned to do both to
the fullest extent that I could, just less often.”
This year, Tops continues to give her greatest effort in
both the class room and the show ring as she plans to
travel from Toronto to Florida as frequently as possible
to ride and compete at the Winter Equestrian Festival
(WEF) in Wellington while simultaneously pursing her
goal of one day working in International Development or
International Law. And while the frequent back-and-forth
trips and both the competitive and academic demands
could be draining for some, Tops wouldn’t have it any
other way.
“I love the balance,” said Tops. “I have to work a little bit
harder at school because Im not there all the time and I
need to get ahead. I need to be organized. I write drafts
way in advance because if a paper is due the Monday after
I get back from a show, it has to be edited and done before
I even leave. It makes me be a little bit sharper for school.
And for riding, the mental aspect and ability to focus
is improved,” concludes Tops. “They complement each
other well. The balance has made me a more well-rounded
person because it has brought both worlds together. It
makes me love each a little bit more.”
Julia Tops competes with India Blue ZF (Mr. Blue x Calvados IV), the
rst product of her family’s breeding program at Zeidler Farm.
Photo by Sportfot
Julia Tops and Zamiro 16, one of the horses she will compete
with this winter at the Winter Equestrian Festival.
Photo by Sportfot
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
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imaginationlanellc.com Nicole and Kendall BourgeoisLocated at The Sherwood Forest Equestrian Center, 28303 SW Baker Rd Sherwood, OR 97140
Congratulations to our riders on
a successful 2016 show season!
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
Christian Heineking and AJE Cluny Victorious in
the $100,000 Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping
Las Vegas
G
erman-born Christian Heineking captured this partnerships
biggest win to date with this victory at the Las Vegas National
Horse Show. Riding the 12-year-old gelding AJE Cluny, the pair
accelerated around this tight course, on a mission to win. His time
of 37.82 seconds, against Mexicos Enrique Gonzalez and Chacna’s
time of 37.83 led to the win by one one-hundredth of a second.
“We got him about three years ago and he is developing into a
very nice Grand Prix horse,” Christian said. With regard to that
very close time, Heineking commented, “Luck was on our side
that day. I think the plan for him (Cluny) next year is to start off in
Wellington, Florida and jump the World Cupqualifiers there.”
Earlier in 2016, this strong team won the $30,000 Grand Prix at
the Texas Shootout in Tyler, TX. Heineking, based at October Hill
Farm in Texas , is always exceedingly busy competing and training,
besides AJE Cluny, co-owned with Sam Jaber and Zad Alsharif of
AJE Equitation, Heineking mentioned another two Grand Prix
rides; the grey Belgian Warmblood gelding NKH Calango, and bay
gelding NKH Quanto, owned by NKH LLC.
Aboard NKH Calango, Christian won the $100,000 Adequan®
Grand Prix concluding the 2016 Summer In The Rockies Series at
The Colorado Horse Park. Three out of the four horses he rode in
this event continued to the jump off. In 2015 he won the same class
on AJE Cluny and this time round they collected fourth and ninth
with NKH Quanto.
Christian has been a professional rider and trainer for the past
21 years, and does have some riding and showing in his family
background.
“My grandfather
rode, so I have
been riding a long
time,” the 37-year-
old Heineking told
us.
Initially,
Heineking honed
his riding skills
at the Redefin
Federal Stud of
Mecklenburg. The
rest, as they always
say, is history.
He moved
to Texas from
Germany in 2008
and is the Vice
President of his October Hill Farm. But he does return to his home
country as often as time permits and has a second home there.
“Living in the States is great. I like it a lot, but I try to go home two
or three times a year. I return both to visit family and friends and to
go on horse buying trips. However if I have any moments to spare I
like to spend time with my wife Erin and daughter Ella.”
We want to thank Christian for taking the time – while on a train
traveling across Germany – to speak with us, and many thanks to
Wendy Gerrish, President and General Manager of October Hill for
organizing.
Las Vegas
National
CSI4*-W
Christian Heineking and AJE Cluny. Photo by McCool Photography
Christian Heineking and AJE Cluny. Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
Richard Spooner and Cristallo Take Great Delight
in Winning the $50,000 Las Vegas National Jumper
Classic
R
ichard Spooner and his wonderful 18-year-old Holsteiner
partner Cristallo soared to a great win against a field of 46.
They were not the only pair to post two clear rounds, but his
jump-off time sealed the deal for him.
“He is a special horse. I kind of had a rough few shows, but once
again he came through for me like he always has. With any horse
there are always ups and downs, and the end of the year always
seems to be hard on the horses.
“Sometimes I think I should cut my year a little bit shorter,”
Richard continued. “You kind of get led down the horse show
rabbit hole, so to speak, but he did his job for me in Vegas.”
Signe Ostby’s Basimodo with Eric Navet aboard was second, with
a total of four faults from the first round, in a jump-off time of
42.60. In third were Lux Lady and Rich Fellers, with four faults
also in round one, in 42.87. Lux Lady is owned by Harry and
Mollie Chapman. Fourth place went to another Signe Ostby horse,
Caillou, ridden by Karl Cook, they had a double clear and stopped
the clock at 43.19.
It had been six months since Spooner and Cristallo won a
competition, but it was a great one and The Master of Faster’s
smile beamed as they took their victory gallop. As at Spruce
Meadows in Calgary, Canada, when they captured the CNOOC
NEXEN Cup Derby. Only he and Lisa Carlsen on Worlds Judgment
moved on to the jump-off, both with four faults each. But Cristallo
rose to the challenge and provided the clear and fast jump-off
round necessary to win the class.
If you think that next year Cristallo, at 19, might not compete
you would be wrong. This horse is in great shape mentally and
physically, and is more than ready for the challenges of the new
show season. Spooner will make a slight adjustment, however.
“Last year we went to Wellington, Florida, and he was good, but
I think this year – he still feels really super – I will let him do some
weeks at Thermal (now Coachella HITS) this coming season. If
he is fit and ready, he can do the $1 million. He is amazing, for
sure. He is the oldest and probably the soundest horse I have,” he
laughed. “He just likes to keep going.”
Spectators of show jumping love Cristallo and he is a fan favorite.
Kudos must be given to Richard, his wife Kaylen, and all of the
other connections to this horse for keeping him healthy, happy,
and so competitive. .
Christian Heineking and AJE Cluny. Photo by McCool Photography
Christian Heineking and AJE Cluny. Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Top: Richard Spooner and Cristallo. Photo by McCool Photography
Left: Richard Spooner, Victory Gallop. Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Eric Navet and Basimodo. Photo by McCool Photography
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
Nayel Nassar Continues Winning Ways
Last month we spoke to Nayel Nassar about his success with both
Lordan and Acita at the Longines Masters of Los Angeles held in
Long Beach, CA. Since then, Nayel has remained an extremely
competitive force on the Grand Prix circuit and he has no
intention of slowing down.
Lordan was a bit spooky and quite green when Nassar first
acquired him, it did take a bit of time for Nassar to form that bond
with the wonderful Hanoverian gelding. Now however, whenever
these two walk to the ring everyone else sits up and takes notice.
Since the Longines Masters of Los Angeles, Nayel and Lordan
were second in both the $52,500 Coachella Valley Classic and the
excellent $200,000 Sunshine Grand Prix at the National Sunshine
II, HITS Coachella, CA mid-November, 2016.
Following the Sunshine circuit the pair moved their tack to
Nevada to take part in the $100,000 Longines FEI World Cup™
Jumping class at the Las Vegas National. Nassar put down the
fastest time in the jump-off, but a tight turn into the combination
caused an unfortunate rail to fall, leaving the pair in sixth place.
Acita also went to Vegas, and she and Nasser were victorious in
the $25,000 Interactive Mortgage U25 Developing Rider Series
Final.
Finally, with the nine-year-old handsome bay gelding Baraka,
Nayel won the $40,000 FEI 1.35m Las Vegas National Speed Stake.
Nassar is a very consistent rider, to be sure, and has definitely
found great horse and built fantastic partnerships.
Born in Chicago but raised in Kuwait, Nayel’s parents wanted
him to try all kinds of sports, with riding being one of them. The
now 25-year-old Nassar began riding at a very early age, and began
jumping when he was about 10. While he did involve himself in
many other sports, it is now obvious that riding had taken a hold.
“The sport (show jumping) was pretty young in Kuwait at the
time. There wasn’t much going on in that region, but it definitely
grew and grew as I was coming up, which was nice. I was an Adult
Amateur at the time. It’s not like I was doing big classes; I wasn’t
able to.”
It was the riding school in Kuwait that brought Nayel and Lordan
together. Nassar found the horse himself in Hungary. The horse
was in a big barn that used to do a lot of business with the school
where Nassar rode. The barn would buy a lot of horses from big
breeders in Europe and Germany and then sell them overseas.
“That day I must have tried about 20 horses, and he (Lordan) was
one of them,” explained Nayal.
Nayel came back to the States in 2009 to attended college at
Stanford, graduating with an Economics degree. He was quick to
recognize that his chosen profession can very quickly turn fickle.
“Our sport can be a little bit dangerous, and you never know what
will happen. Even though I’ve made it my career, I believe you
always need an education first. That way if something happens – if
for whatever reason you are unable to ride – there is something
else.
“I think its important to set a good example and let’s face it, most
riders are not going to go on to become professional Grand Prix
riders. You have to have some sort of degree to fall back on. It’s a
very dicult sport, and not an easy thing to break into.
“There was definitely a condition with my parents to doing horses
full-time,” Nayel continued. “They wanted to make sure I got an
education, the experience was great and I met some super people,
so it was a win-win.”
Nayal certainly leads by example and his words are wise ones to
those coming with plans of a career in equestrian sport.
Nayel moved to the San Diego area in 2015, and that is where his
training facility is located. His right-hand girl is Linda Algeborg,
who has been with Nassar 13 years.
Below: Nayal Nassar and Acita. Photo by McCool Photography
Nayal Nassar and Lordan. Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
“I sure just can’t call Linda my groom, that would be an
understatement! She is my groom/barn manager/caretaker. She is
also my rider as well; she rides the horses when I’m not around and
keeps everything going.
“We have a very good relationship, and she is obviously extremely
loyal to me and the horses, which is great. It also gives me someone
to bounce ideas off of, and she helps me on the ground with the
horses.”
Even though Linda will help Nayel on the ground, he does not
have a ‘professional’ ground person or trainer, and has not done so
for a couple of years. Not too many people could pull that off and
be as successful as he has been.
“It’s not as if I haven’t had any training,” he explained. “I have
trained with some very, very good riders and educated people in
the sport here and in Europe. But I’ve taken all that information
with me and just tried to apply it as a teacher.”
Besides Lordan and Acita, Nassar has some horses coming up that
he is excited about.
“My string right now consists of five horses; I’ve got a seven-year-
old, an eight-year-old, two nine-year-olds (which includes Acita),
and then Lordan. I also have a six-year-old that the Chang’s and I
just bought. That one is still over in Europe and we are bringing it
over quite soon. I am really excited about that one.”
It certainly does not appear as if Nayel will be using that
Economics degree in a different field in the near future. His
continued success in the Grand Prix ring and wonderful horses
will be fun and interesting to follow in 2017.
Nayal Nassar and Lordan. Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
2016 GRAND PRIX & HUNTER DERBY WINNERS
SHP SPRING CLASSIC
$25,000 EQUINE INSURANCE GRAND PRIX
OSOPHIA & KEVIN WINKEL
$5,000 EQUINE OMEGA COMPLETE OPEN DERBY
FERRAGAMO & NINA ALARIO
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
CRUSADER & PAIGE PASTORINO
HMI EQUESTRIAN CHALLENGE
$25,000 CLASSIC EQUINE GRAND PRIX
FIRESTONE S & KRISTIN HARDIN
$5,000 TACK WAREHOUSE OPEN DERBY
BUNISTAR & HUGH MUTCH
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
DINNER FOR TWO & RANSOME ROMBAUER
HMI JUNE CLASSIC
$30,000 SMARTPAK GRAND PRIX
CARLTON CAFE & JILL PRIETO
$5,000 DEVOUCOUX OPEN DERBY
DOUBLE PLAY & MISSY FROLEY
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
SHERRY KOZLOFF & FERRAGAMO
HMI EQUESTRIAN CLASSIC
$40,000 EQUINE INSURANCE GRAND PRIX
CALOUKIE & PATRICK SEATON
$10,000 USHJA INTERNATIONAL DERBY
PRESENTED BY BARNSTYLE
FULL CIRCLE & HOPE GLYNN
STRIDES & TIDES
$25,000 BAY CLUB GRAND PRIX
FIRESTONE S & KRISTIN HARDIN
$5,000 EQUINE OMEGA COMPLETE OPEN DERBY
CHESIRE & KYLEE ARBUCKLE
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
LASSALLE & EMMA TOWNSEND
GIANT STEPS CHARITY CLASSIC
$40,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE GRAND PRIX
JONKHEER Z & GUY THOMAS
$5,000 TOWNSEND FAMILY OPEN DERBY
DELILAH & NICK HANESS
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
WALK THIS WAY & CARLY SERENI
SHP SEASON FINALE
$25,000 ARIAT GRAND PRIX
BALDIRA & RAYMOND TEXEL
$10,000 USHJA INTERNATIONAL DERBY
PRESENTED BY DEVOUCOUX
ENTOURAGE & HOPE GLYNN
2017 SHOW SEASON
SHP SPRING CLASSIC | A
MAY 10 - 14, 2017
HMI EQUESTRIAN CHALLENGE | A
MAY 17 - 21, 2017
HMI JUNE CLASSIC | A
JUNE 14 - 18, 2017
HMI EQUESTRIAN CLASSIC | AA
JULY 26 - 30, 2017
GIANT STEPS CHARITY CLASSIC | AA
AUGUST 2 - 6, 2017
STRIDES & TIDES | A
SEPTEMBER 13 - 17, 2017
SHP SEASON FINALE | A
SEPTEMBER 20 - 24, 2017
SONOMAHORSEPARK.COM
2016 ARIAT CIRCUIT CHAMPION AWARD WINNERS
GRAND PRIX CIRCUIT AWARD
C: FIRESTONE S & KRISTIN HARDIN
R: CARLTON CAFE & JILL PRIETO
HIGH JR/AO JUMPER
C: V CANTATE & SIMONNE BERG
R: FIONA VAN BLOEMENDAEL & PEGGY MUNKDALE
LOW JR/AO JUMPER
C: CORNELL DE MUZE & NICOLETTE HIRT
R: ANTON & AMBER CZAJKOWSKI
JR/AM MODIFIED JUMPER
C: INMAN & SARAH WITTEN
R: ARIVADERCI ALEX & MEGAN WOOD
ADULT AMATEUR JUMPER
C: PHILADELPHIA & ZUME GALLAHER
R: TRAVELER & CHRISTINE O’HANLAN
CHILDREN’S JUMPER
C: HERTOGIN TER DRIE LEIEN & ALEXIS LEONG
R: KALINERO DU GALETE & PARKER CLIFF
CHILD/ADULT TRAINING JUMPER
C: CHAPARRAL’S HAWKEYE & ZACKO HARDIN
R: ALEXANDER THE GREAT & CHLOE MEUSE
CHILD/ADULT SCHOOLING JUMPER
C: CANDALERO & KIM GILL-FAVIER
R: TREBUCHET & MAYA WADHWANI
EQUITATION 18 & OVER
C: ONDRUS & LAURA OWENS
R: SILVER OAK & ELIZABETH ROBBINS
EQUITATION 17 & UNDER
C: CINTAS & ALEXIS LEONG
R: CALVIN BENNING & KELSEY FENGER
OPEN HUNTER DERBY CIRCUIT AWARD
C: FULL CIRCLE & HOPE GLYNN
R: CORRIENDO TAU & HOPE GLYNN
JR/AM HUNTER DERBY CIRCUIT AWARD
C: WALK THIS WAY & CARLY SERENI
R: LASALLE & EMMA TOWNSEND
Sonoma HorSe Park
LOW ADULT AMATEUR JUMPER
C: BELLANOVA & JULIE HAENER
R: ANNESTASIA & MICHAEL LESSER
LOW CHILDREN’S JUMPER
C: DOLLY & ALICE MARTIN
R: WIN VISION & NAOMI RUBIN
MODIFIED ADULT AMATEUR JUMPER
C: BELLANOVA & JULIE HAENER
R: CANADA & MIKE GARLAND
MODIFIED CHILDREN’S JUMPER
C: AM ZIPY SHARP SHOOTER & TYLER HARDIN
R: BARONESS C & CRYSTAL CUMMINGS
PRE-ADULT AMATEUR JUMPER
C: LILY & JAMIE BUCK
R: CANADA & MIKE GARLAND
PRE-CHILDREN’S JUMPER
C: ALEXANDER THE GREAT & CHLOE MEUSE
R: R LOBO & LOUISE MURPHY
CONFORMATION HUNTER
C: SEASIDE & KATIE GARDNER
R: KENSINGTON ASK & PETER LOMBARDO
HIGH PERFORM/2ND YR GREEN HUNTER
C: DAVINCI & HOPE GLYNN
R: FULL CIRCLE & HOPE GLYNN
FIRST YEAR GREEN HUNTER
C: DOUBLE PLAY & MISSY FROLEY
R: CHESIRE & KYLEE ARBUCKLE
PERFORMANCE HUNTER 3’6
C: DROP THE MIC & MISSY FROLEY
R: SOUTHSIDE & HOPE GLYNN
PERFORMANCE HUNTER 3’3
C: SAMBUCA & KYLEE ARBUCKLE
R: REGALO & NINA ALARIO
PRE-GREEN HUNTER
C: FALCON & HOPE GLYNN
R: CALENDAR GIRL & SHANNON BECK
AMATEUR OWNER HUNTER 3’6
C: WALK THIS WAY & CARLY SERENI
R: CRUSADER & PAIGE PASTORINO
AMATEUR OWNER HUNTER 3’3
C: MISS JANUARY & SLOAN LINDEMANN-BARNETT
R: CIAO & ALICIA JOVAIS
JUNIOR HUNTER 3’6
C: CZECH POINT & SARA MURPHY
R: DINNER FOR TWO & RANSOME ROMBAUER
JUNIOR HUNTER 3’3
C: BUNISTAR & NAOMI RUBIN
R: CORDOVA BAY & SARA MURPHY
AMATEUR MODIFIED HUNTER
C: WOODSTOCK & OLIVIA HELLMAN
R: HALLIDIO & MARCEL KRISTEL
JUNIOR MODIFIED HUNTER
C: CORDOVA BAY & SARA MURPHY
R: HEMINGWAY & CELIA TONKIN
ADULT AMATEUR HUNTER
C: WOODSTOCK & OLIVIA HELLMAN
R: ONDRUS & LAURA OWENS
CHILDREN’S HUNTER
C: ESTEBAN LA PAZ & AVERY GLYNN
R: BRUGGE & KATIE LEE
LOW ADULT AMATEUR HUNTER
C: SOUTHSIDE & OLIVIA HELLMAN
R: LIFESTYLE & SARAH HELLMAN
LOW CHILDREN’S HUNTER
C: AMERICAN IDOL & ANAM TERRA
R: ENCORE & ANYA GUPTA
MODIFIED ADULT AMATEUR HUNTER
C: WEATHERLY & RACHAEL GUAJARDO
R: KINGSTON & MICHELA TORCHIO
MODIFIED CHILDREN’S HUNTER
C: CARAVAGGIO & CLARA BONOMI
R: AUTOBAHN & OLIVIA CARUSI
LARGE PONY HUNTER
C: HALLELUJAH & LAUREN AUBERT
R: BLUE A KISS & VIRGINIA BONNIE
MEDIUM PONY HUNTER
C: ALWAYS HAPPY & AVERY GLYNN
R: HELICON MILES OF SMILES & MAYA WADHWANI
SMALL PONY HUNTER
C: HEAVENLY PATCH OF BLUE & SHILOH ROSEBOOM
R: HARRY WINSTON & ELLA MEUSE
GREEN PONY HUNTER
C: CALIFORNIA DREAMIN & MADELINE PARK
R: FINAL TOUCH & ALEXIS LEONG
CHILDREN’S PONY HUNTER
C: KEY WEST & ALEXANDRA EISLER
R: COPYRIGHT & CHARLOTTE COLLINS
LONG STIRRUP HUNTER
C: HUGO & DIANA KOLL
R: JALAPENO MARGARITA & JENNIE LEIGH
LONG STIRRUP EQUITATION
C: JUSTICE D’UXELLES & ALISON FETHEROLF
R: STILLWATER SPLASH & CELESTE WHITE
SHORT STIRRUP HUNTER
C: AK DENALI & JOY BRANDT
R: HEART TO RESIST & MADELINE MIAO
SHORT STIRRUP EQUITATION
C: SECRET HANDSHAKE & MIKA CLEAR
R: STEELE MY KISSES & MADELINE TWOMEY
CROSS RAIL HUNTER
C: BELLA BE BEAUTIFUL & MAYA EWING
R: IVY LEAGUE & CALLIE ZIMMERMAN
CROSS RAIL EQUITATION
C: SMALL GIFT & DAPHNE GRETTON
R: HEART TO RESIST & MADELINE MIAO
WALK TROT
C: ON STAR & NICO ALARIO
R: SMALL GIFT & DAPHNE GRETTON
©Alden Corrigan Media
2016 ARIAT CIRCUIT CHAMPION AWARD WINNERS
GRAND PRIX CIRCUIT AWARD
C: FIRESTONE S & KRISTIN HARDIN
R: CARLTON CAFE & JILL PRIETO
HIGH JR/AO JUMPER
C: V CANTATE & SIMONNE BERG
R: FIONA VAN BLOEMENDAEL & PEGGY MUNKDALE
LOW JR/AO JUMPER
C: CORNELL DE MUZE & NICOLETTE HIRT
R: ANTON & AMBER CZAJKOWSKI
JR/AM MODIFIED JUMPER
C: INMAN & SARAH WITTEN
R: ARIVADERCI ALEX & MEGAN WOOD
ADULT AMATEUR JUMPER
C: PHILADELPHIA & ZUME GALLAHER
R: TRAVELER & CHRISTINE O’HANLAN
CHILDREN’S JUMPER
C: HERTOGIN TER DRIE LEIEN & ALEXIS LEONG
R: KALINERO DU GALETE & PARKER CLIFF
CHILD/ADULT TRAINING JUMPER
C: CHAPARRAL’S HAWKEYE & ZACKO HARDIN
R: ALEXANDER THE GREAT & CHLOE MEUSE
CHILD/ADULT SCHOOLING JUMPER
C: CANDALERO & KIM GILL-FAVIER
R: TREBUCHET & MAYA WADHWANI
EQUITATION 18 & OVER
C: ONDRUS & LAURA OWENS
R: SILVER OAK & ELIZABETH ROBBINS
EQUITATION 17 & UNDER
C: CINTAS & ALEXIS LEONG
R: CALVIN BENNING & KELSEY FENGER
OPEN HUNTER DERBY CIRCUIT AWARD
C: FULL CIRCLE & HOPE GLYNN
R: CORRIENDO TAU & HOPE GLYNN
JR/AM HUNTER DERBY CIRCUIT AWARD
C: WALK THIS WAY & CARLY SERENI
R: LASALLE & EMMA TOWNSEND
Sonoma HorSe Park
LOW ADULT AMATEUR JUMPER
C: BELLANOVA & JULIE HAENER
R: ANNESTASIA & MICHAEL LESSER
LOW CHILDREN’S JUMPER
C: DOLLY & ALICE MARTIN
R: WIN VISION & NAOMI RUBIN
MODIFIED ADULT AMATEUR JUMPER
C: BELLANOVA & JULIE HAENER
R: CANADA & MIKE GARLAND
MODIFIED CHILDREN’S JUMPER
C: AM ZIPY SHARP SHOOTER & TYLER HARDIN
R: BARONESS C & CRYSTAL CUMMINGS
PRE-ADULT AMATEUR JUMPER
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R: FULL CIRCLE & HOPE GLYNN
FIRST YEAR GREEN HUNTER
C: DOUBLE PLAY & MISSY FROLEY
R: CHESIRE & KYLEE ARBUCKLE
PERFORMANCE HUNTER 3’6
C: DROP THE MIC & MISSY FROLEY
R: SOUTHSIDE & HOPE GLYNN
PERFORMANCE HUNTER 3’3
C: SAMBUCA & KYLEE ARBUCKLE
R: REGALO & NINA ALARIO
PRE-GREEN HUNTER
C: FALCON & HOPE GLYNN
R: CALENDAR GIRL & SHANNON BECK
AMATEUR OWNER HUNTER 3’6
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R: CRUSADER & PAIGE PASTORINO
AMATEUR OWNER HUNTER 3’3
C: MISS JANUARY & SLOAN LINDEMANN-BARNETT
R: CIAO & ALICIA JOVAIS
JUNIOR HUNTER 3’6
C: CZECH POINT & SARA MURPHY
R: DINNER FOR TWO & RANSOME ROMBAUER
JUNIOR HUNTER 3’3
C: BUNISTAR & NAOMI RUBIN
R: CORDOVA BAY & SARA MURPHY
AMATEUR MODIFIED HUNTER
C: WOODSTOCK & OLIVIA HELLMAN
R: HALLIDIO & MARCEL KRISTEL
JUNIOR MODIFIED HUNTER
C: CORDOVA BAY & SARA MURPHY
R: HEMINGWAY & CELIA TONKIN
ADULT AMATEUR HUNTER
C: WOODSTOCK & OLIVIA HELLMAN
R: ONDRUS & LAURA OWENS
CHILDREN’S HUNTER
C: ESTEBAN LA PAZ & AVERY GLYNN
R: BRUGGE & KATIE LEE
LOW ADULT AMATEUR HUNTER
C: SOUTHSIDE & OLIVIA HELLMAN
R: LIFESTYLE & SARAH HELLMAN
LOW CHILDREN’S HUNTER
C: AMERICAN IDOL & ANAM TERRA
R: ENCORE & ANYA GUPTA
MODIFIED ADULT AMATEUR HUNTER
C: WEATHERLY & RACHAEL GUAJARDO
R: KINGSTON & MICHELA TORCHIO
MODIFIED CHILDREN’S HUNTER
C: CARAVAGGIO & CLARA BONOMI
R: AUTOBAHN & OLIVIA CARUSI
LARGE PONY HUNTER
C: HALLELUJAH & LAUREN AUBERT
R: BLUE A KISS & VIRGINIA BONNIE
MEDIUM PONY HUNTER
C: ALWAYS HAPPY & AVERY GLYNN
R: HELICON MILES OF SMILES & MAYA WADHWANI
SMALL PONY HUNTER
C: HEAVENLY PATCH OF BLUE & SHILOH ROSEBOOM
R: HARRY WINSTON & ELLA MEUSE
GREEN PONY HUNTER
C: CALIFORNIA DREAMIN & MADELINE PARK
R: FINAL TOUCH & ALEXIS LEONG
CHILDREN’S PONY HUNTER
C: KEY WEST & ALEXANDRA EISLER
R: COPYRIGHT & CHARLOTTE COLLINS
LONG STIRRUP HUNTER
C: HUGO & DIANA KOLL
R: JALAPENO MARGARITA & JENNIE LEIGH
LONG STIRRUP EQUITATION
C: JUSTICE D’UXELLES & ALISON FETHEROLF
R: STILLWATER SPLASH & CELESTE WHITE
SHORT STIRRUP HUNTER
C: AK DENALI & JOY BRANDT
R: HEART TO RESIST & MADELINE MIAO
SHORT STIRRUP EQUITATION
C: SECRET HANDSHAKE & MIKA CLEAR
R: STEELE MY KISSES & MADELINE TWOMEY
CROSS RAIL HUNTER
C: BELLA BE BEAUTIFUL & MAYA EWING
R: IVY LEAGUE & CALLIE ZIMMERMAN
CROSS RAIL EQUITATION
C: SMALL GIFT & DAPHNE GRETTON
R: HEART TO RESIST & MADELINE MIAO
WALK TROT
C: ON STAR & NICO ALARIO
R: SMALL GIFT & DAPHNE GRETTON
©Alden Corrigan Media
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$10,000 USHJA INTERNATIONAL DERBY
PRESENTED BY BARNSTYLE
FULL CIRCLE & HOPE GLYNN
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$25,000 BAY CLUB GRAND PRIX
FIRESTONE S & KRISTIN HARDIN
$5,000 EQUINE OMEGA COMPLETE OPEN DERBY
CHESIRE & KYLEE ARBUCKLE
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
LASSALLE & EMMA TOWNSEND
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$40,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE GRAND PRIX
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$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
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HMI EQUESTRIAN CHALLENGE
$25,000 CLASSIC EQUINE GRAND PRIX
FIRESTONE S & KRISTIN HARDIN
$5,000 TACK WAREHOUSE OPEN DERBY
BUNISTAR & HUGH MUTCH
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
DINNER FOR TWO & RANSOME ROMBAUER
HMI JUNE CLASSIC
$30,000 SMARTPAK GRAND PRIX
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$5,000 DEVOUCOUX OPEN DERBY
DOUBLE PLAY & MISSY FROLEY
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
SHERRY KOZLOFF & FERRAGAMO
HMI EQUESTRIAN CLASSIC
$40,000 EQUINE INSURANCE GRAND PRIX
CALOUKIE & PATRICK SEATON
$10,000 USHJA INTERNATIONAL DERBY
PRESENTED BY BARNSTYLE
FULL CIRCLE & HOPE GLYNN
STRIDES & TIDES
$25,000 BAY CLUB GRAND PRIX
FIRESTONE S & KRISTIN HARDIN
$5,000 EQUINE OMEGA COMPLETE OPEN DERBY
CHESIRE & KYLEE ARBUCKLE
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
LASSALLE & EMMA TOWNSEND
GIANT STEPS CHARITY CLASSIC
$40,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE GRAND PRIX
JONKHEER Z & GUY THOMAS
$5,000 TOWNSEND FAMILY OPEN DERBY
DELILAH & NICK HANESS
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
WALK THIS WAY & CARLY SERENI
SHP SEASON FINALE
$25,000 ARIAT GRAND PRIX
BALDIRA & RAYMOND TEXEL
$10,000 USHJA INTERNATIONAL DERBY
PRESENTED BY DEVOUCOUX
ENTOURAGE & HOPE GLYNN
2017 SHOW SEASON
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MAY 10 - 14, 2017
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MAY 17 - 21, 2017
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JUNE 14 - 18, 2017
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JULY 26 - 30, 2017
GIANT STEPS CHARITY CLASSIC | AA
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SEPTEMBER 13 - 17, 2017
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SEPTEMBER 20 - 24, 2017
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2016 GRAND PRIX & HUNTER DERBY WINNERS
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$25,000 EQUINE INSURANCE GRAND PRIX
OSOPHIA & KEVIN WINKEL
$5,000 EQUINE OMEGA COMPLETE OPEN DERBY
FERRAGAMO & NINA ALARIO
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
CRUSADER & PAIGE PASTORINO
HMI EQUESTRIAN CHALLENGE
$25,000 CLASSIC EQUINE GRAND PRIX
FIRESTONE S & KRISTIN HARDIN
$5,000 TACK WAREHOUSE OPEN DERBY
BUNISTAR & HUGH MUTCH
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
DINNER FOR TWO & RANSOME ROMBAUER
HMI JUNE CLASSIC
$30,000 SMARTPAK GRAND PRIX
CARLTON CAFE & JILL PRIETO
$5,000 DEVOUCOUX OPEN DERBY
DOUBLE PLAY & MISSY FROLEY
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
SHERRY KOZLOFF & FERRAGAMO
HMI EQUESTRIAN CLASSIC
$40,000 EQUINE INSURANCE GRAND PRIX
CALOUKIE & PATRICK SEATON
$10,000 USHJA INTERNATIONAL DERBY
PRESENTED BY BARNSTYLE
FULL CIRCLE & HOPE GLYNN
STRIDES & TIDES
$25,000 BAY CLUB GRAND PRIX
FIRESTONE S & KRISTIN HARDIN
$5,000 EQUINE OMEGA COMPLETE OPEN DERBY
CHESIRE & KYLEE ARBUCKLE
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
LASSALLE & EMMA TOWNSEND
GIANT STEPS CHARITY CLASSIC
$40,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE GRAND PRIX
JONKHEER Z & GUY THOMAS
$5,000 TOWNSEND FAMILY OPEN DERBY
DELILAH & NICK HANESS
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
WALK THIS WAY & CARLY SERENI
SHP SEASON FINALE
$25,000 ARIAT GRAND PRIX
BALDIRA & RAYMOND TEXEL
$10,000 USHJA INTERNATIONAL DERBY
PRESENTED BY DEVOUCOUX
ENTOURAGE & HOPE GLYNN
2017 SHOW SEASON
SHP SPRING CLASSIC | A
MAY 10 - 14, 2017
HMI EQUESTRIAN CHALLENGE | A
MAY 17 - 21, 2017
HMI JUNE CLASSIC | A
JUNE 14 - 18, 2017
HMI EQUESTRIAN CLASSIC | AA
JULY 26 - 30, 2017
GIANT STEPS CHARITY CLASSIC | AA
AUGUST 2 - 6, 2017
STRIDES & TIDES | A
SEPTEMBER 13 - 17, 2017
SHP SEASON FINALE | A
SEPTEMBER 20 - 24, 2017
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2016 ARIAT CIRCUIT CHAMPION AWARD WINNERS
GRAND PRIX CIRCUIT AWARD
C: FIRESTONE S & KRISTIN HARDIN
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R: FIONA VAN BLOEMENDAEL & PEGGY MUNKDALE
LOW JR/AO JUMPER
C: CORNELL DE MUZE & NICOLETTE HIRT
R: ANTON & AMBER CZAJKOWSKI
JR/AM MODIFIED JUMPER
C: INMAN & SARAH WITTEN
R: ARIVADERCI ALEX & MEGAN WOOD
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C: PHILADELPHIA & ZUME GALLAHER
R: TRAVELER & CHRISTINE O’HANLAN
CHILDREN’S JUMPER
C: HERTOGIN TER DRIE LEIEN & ALEXIS LEONG
R: KALINERO DU GALETE & PARKER CLIFF
CHILD/ADULT TRAINING JUMPER
C: CHAPARRAL’S HAWKEYE & ZACKO HARDIN
R: ALEXANDER THE GREAT & CHLOE MEUSE
CHILD/ADULT SCHOOLING JUMPER
C: CANDALERO & KIM GILL-FAVIER
R: TREBUCHET & MAYA WADHWANI
EQUITATION 18 & OVER
C: ONDRUS & LAURA OWENS
R: SILVER OAK & ELIZABETH ROBBINS
EQUITATION 17 & UNDER
C: CINTAS & ALEXIS LEONG
R: CALVIN BENNING & KELSEY FENGER
OPEN HUNTER DERBY CIRCUIT AWARD
C: FULL CIRCLE & HOPE GLYNN
R: CORRIENDO TAU & HOPE GLYNN
JR/AM HUNTER DERBY CIRCUIT AWARD
C: WALK THIS WAY & CARLY SERENI
R: LASALLE & EMMA TOWNSEND
Sonoma HorSe Park
LOW ADULT AMATEUR JUMPER
C: BELLANOVA & JULIE HAENER
R: ANNESTASIA & MICHAEL LESSER
LOW CHILDREN’S JUMPER
C: DOLLY & ALICE MARTIN
R: WIN VISION & NAOMI RUBIN
MODIFIED ADULT AMATEUR JUMPER
C: BELLANOVA & JULIE HAENER
R: CANADA & MIKE GARLAND
MODIFIED CHILDREN’S JUMPER
C: AM ZIPY SHARP SHOOTER & TYLER HARDIN
R: BARONESS C & CRYSTAL CUMMINGS
PRE-ADULT AMATEUR JUMPER
C: LILY & JAMIE BUCK
R: CANADA & MIKE GARLAND
PRE-CHILDREN’S JUMPER
C: ALEXANDER THE GREAT & CHLOE MEUSE
R: R LOBO & LOUISE MURPHY
CONFORMATION HUNTER
C: SEASIDE & KATIE GARDNER
R: KENSINGTON ASK & PETER LOMBARDO
HIGH PERFORM/2ND YR GREEN HUNTER
C: DAVINCI & HOPE GLYNN
R: FULL CIRCLE & HOPE GLYNN
FIRST YEAR GREEN HUNTER
C: DOUBLE PLAY & MISSY FROLEY
R: CHESIRE & KYLEE ARBUCKLE
PERFORMANCE HUNTER 3’6
C: DROP THE MIC & MISSY FROLEY
R: SOUTHSIDE & HOPE GLYNN
PERFORMANCE HUNTER 3’3
C: SAMBUCA & KYLEE ARBUCKLE
R: REGALO & NINA ALARIO
PRE-GREEN HUNTER
C: FALCON & HOPE GLYNN
R: CALENDAR GIRL & SHANNON BECK
AMATEUR OWNER HUNTER 3’6
C: WALK THIS WAY & CARLY SERENI
R: CRUSADER & PAIGE PASTORINO
AMATEUR OWNER HUNTER 3’3
C: MISS JANUARY & SLOAN LINDEMANN-BARNETT
R: CIAO & ALICIA JOVAIS
JUNIOR HUNTER 3’6
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R: CORDOVA BAY & SARA MURPHY
AMATEUR MODIFIED HUNTER
C: WOODSTOCK & OLIVIA HELLMAN
R: HALLIDIO & MARCEL KRISTEL
JUNIOR MODIFIED HUNTER
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LOW CHILDREN’S HUNTER
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R: ENCORE & ANYA GUPTA
MODIFIED ADULT AMATEUR HUNTER
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R: AUTOBAHN & OLIVIA CARUSI
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C: HALLELUJAH & LAUREN AUBERT
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CROSS RAIL EQUITATION
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WALK TROT
C: ON STAR & NICO ALARIO
R: SMALL GIFT & DAPHNE GRETTON
©Alden Corrigan Media
2016 GRAND PRIX & HUNTER DERBY WINNERS
SHP SPRING CLASSIC
$25,000 EQUINE INSURANCE GRAND PRIX
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$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
CRUSADER & PAIGE PASTORINO
HMI EQUESTRIAN CHALLENGE
$25,000 CLASSIC EQUINE GRAND PRIX
FIRESTONE S & KRISTIN HARDIN
$5,000 TACK WAREHOUSE OPEN DERBY
BUNISTAR & HUGH MUTCH
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
DINNER FOR TWO & RANSOME ROMBAUER
HMI JUNE CLASSIC
$30,000 SMARTPAK GRAND PRIX
CARLTON CAFE & JILL PRIETO
$5,000 DEVOUCOUX OPEN DERBY
DOUBLE PLAY & MISSY FROLEY
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
SHERRY KOZLOFF & FERRAGAMO
HMI EQUESTRIAN CLASSIC
$40,000 EQUINE INSURANCE GRAND PRIX
CALOUKIE & PATRICK SEATON
$10,000 USHJA INTERNATIONAL DERBY
PRESENTED BY BARNSTYLE
FULL CIRCLE & HOPE GLYNN
STRIDES & TIDES
$25,000 BAY CLUB GRAND PRIX
FIRESTONE S & KRISTIN HARDIN
$5,000 EQUINE OMEGA COMPLETE OPEN DERBY
CHESIRE & KYLEE ARBUCKLE
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
LASSALLE & EMMA TOWNSEND
GIANT STEPS CHARITY CLASSIC
$40,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE GRAND PRIX
JONKHEER Z & GUY THOMAS
$5,000 TOWNSEND FAMILY OPEN DERBY
DELILAH & NICK HANESS
$5,000 CIRCLE OAK EQUINE JR/AM DERBY
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MAY 17 - 21, 2017
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HMI EQUESTRIAN CLASSIC | AA
JULY 26 - 30, 2017
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AUGUST 2 - 6, 2017
STRIDES & TIDES | A
SEPTEMBER 13 - 17, 2017
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SEPTEMBER 20 - 24, 2017
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 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
It is simply impossible to separate
the interesting tale of the Latty
family, generational breeders of
Connemara ponies and horses from
the long history of the Irish breed
itself. Both narratives are as intricate
and entwined as a Celtic Knot. The
stories are worthy of the telling,
based on facts and maybe with a wee
bit of “blarney” added. As I set out to
navigate through these meandering
histories and make sense of it all for
you,the reader, I decided the first
order of business should be describe
a single family’s history and true
passion for a specific breed,in this
case the Connemara. Why so?
There is Something About the Irish
e Conemaa n e Latty Fmil
By Mary Killackey Arnstad
Family Story: History
Joan Latty (nee Roberts) was born in Oakland, California in 1939.
Although her family was not “horsey” she later learned a cousin in
England was well connected with horse sports and international
competitors. What she came to call her “vast extended family”
played a major role in all she did with horses for over six decades.
At age seven, living in the Walnut Creek area of Northern
California she became “enthralled” with Morgan horses at a
neighboring farm. Watching them being ridden down bridle paths
was simply “so beautiful” and captured her young heart. At age
eight one of her first rides has remained an indelible memory.
Riding with her mother and older sister down a very steep trail
the horses took off. Joans reaction, “I was afraid but then thought
hey, this is fun!” In fourth grade, Joan and her family moved to the
East Coast and Greenwich, Connecticut. When she reached sixth
grade and age eleven she noticed kids from her school in riding
clothes. She pestered her mother until she succeeded in having
a birthday gift of a riding lesson, her very first, at nearby Round
Hill Club Stables. Early on Joan got “tangled up” with a Shetland
pony named Smokey. When I asked her what she learned from this
naughty pony, Joan simply said
“what DIDN’T he teach me! The little stinkpot was tethered to
an anchor. There were no fences. When we kids got in his space
he would charge us with his ears flat back, his teeth bared and his
eyes rolling and try to bite us. He was hell bent for election. We all
got bucked off daily. I remember when Smokey was 18 they finally
gelded him. I still have one of his shoes.”
After three years of lessons and a growing passion for riding both
horses and ponies, the family moved again, back to the West Coast
to Ross, California. Joan was fourteen. Her mother Catherine
(“Catsy”) was now fully dedicated to furthering her daughter’s love
of riding and her English born father was on board as well.
Two sisters, Margaret and Barbara, took up the sport. Thus,
a family equestrian lifestyle took hold and grew. Progress with
riding lessons was patient and steady, from lead line to walk to
posting the trot. A secure seat was mandatory before jumping and
old school discipline prevailed. Although originally interested in
Morgan horses, a breed that originated in Massachusetts, the stage
was set for a lifelong love of the Connemara. It all started with an
English magazine “Pony” that captured her imagination, never to
be forgotten.
“Books and magazines matter. They were my early sources
of education about different breeds of horses and ponies,
horsemanship and various riding disciplines. They also have
nourished my dreams over the years. I was an avid reader,
attending all the school book fairs and I clearly remember a
heroine who was a girl named Connemara. The author was
Dorothy Lyons, the book entitled Silver Birch.”
While living in the Northern California area, Joan rode with
Jimmy Williams, was deeply influenced by Gene Lewis and
competed on the “A” circuit. She also attended Mills College
(which had an equestrian program in that era) and rode for Alex
Sysin who ran the Stanford University riding facility. Joan met her
husband Fred, marrying in 1962.
Daughter Victoria was born in 1968 and son Derek arrived to
complete the family of four in 1972. From 1955, at age fifteen,to
1990 Joan was teaching, training and competing in Northern
California. She declared professional in 1962 and has remained a
pro ever since, maintaining an active membership in USEF and
USHJA plus several Connemara governing organizations. Her
resume also includes managing a variety of successful horse shows
in multiple disciplines in both California and Oregon. The entire
Latty clan was involved in equestrian event planning.
The pivotal year involving the Connemara breeding program was
1988 when the Latty family bought the stallion Castle Beau Geste,
born in 1986 and still thriving today. “Beau” became the foundation
sire of Potiquimi Farm. This unique farm name is Cherokee,
honoring patriarch Fred Latty’s Native American and Irish heritage.
“Beau throws heart. He stamps his foals” Joan states.
Interestingly her plan was to focus on broodmares. Fred Latty
believed in the stallion.
“Fred did everything for the family breeding program, from
Ancestral Home
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
There is Something About the Irish
e Conemaa n e Latty Fmil
By Mary Killackey Arnstad
cleaning stalls, building barns and fences, to feeding and hauling
to horse shows as well as keeping the books. He was all in! His
only condition for our growing involvement with Connemara
ponies was that the children be totally involved and work hard.
So our son Derek broke all the ponies we bred and also had a
very successful stadium jumper and cross country competition
record with Beau. Meanwhile, our daughter Tori (Victoria) was a
natural horsewoman and worked for years side by side with her
brother. Having moved in 1990 to the Rogue Valley in Southern
Oregon from Northern California and having purchased our new
Potiquimi Farm in Ashland, it was a special and joyful time for all
of us! Tori later went off to University of California Davis where
she graduated and Derek to Shattuck St. Mary’s in Minnesota and
on to Syracuse University in New York, so Fred and I had to fill
in. But when they both returned home, the farm and breeding
business continued to grow with their help.”
About The Breed
“The Ponies Pick their People” Joan Latty
The versatile Connemara Pony is an ancient breed whose
ancestral home lies in the western part of Northern Ireland, known
as Connemara and historically as “Connaught”. Since early in
Britains Celtic era starting circa 4 B.C, there has been evidence of
small (11 -13 hand) hardy equines roaming the hills in this area. The
Connemara region is known for rugged terrain of boulder-strewn
mountains, treacherous bogs and is lashed by the North Atlantic
storms. It is likely the gene pools that lie at the base of these ponies
come from both the Northern European conquering Celts plus
the southern strain of Barb horses brought by ship to the port of
Galway by Spanish traders. There remains some mystery to this
heritage. The Irish farmers domesticated the “Hobbies” - as they
were called in the Middle Ages - and they were found to be hardy,
sure-footed, thrifty and cooperative, providing transportation
during war and peace, both under saddle and in harness. Ranging
from duties plowing fields to weekly trips to church on Sunday,
the ponies often competed in popular races on Connemara’s sandy
beaches. Above all,the ponies provided the farm with a yearly
income by producing a saleable foal that could be traded or sold for
a winter’s provisions for the entire family.
A good pony showed grit,stamina,intelligence and docility, often
acting as a family member and seeming to seek, rather than shun,
the company of humans. The arrival of the 20th century brought
significant changes to the people and ponies of Connemara. One
of them came about as a result of the formation of the Connemara
Pony Breeders Society (CPBS) in 1923. The Society was a first
attempt to organize and codify the native ponies and after slow
acceptance “improvements to the breed” began to take hold. The
arrival of automobiles and tractors threatened the ponies with
widespread unemployment but fortunately leisure time to enjoy
equine sports provided a new direction for this adaptable breed.
Through the introduction of stallions of hotter breeding to the
original native stock, the “golden age’’ of the Connemara Pony
was ushered in.
Two Thoroughbreds, one Arabian and three Irish Draught
stallions were specially appointed and their offspring were
eligible for inspection at age 2. If found to qualify they were
entered as purebreds in the CPBS Stud Book. Great genetic vigor,
incredible stamina, speed and a natural jumping talent as well
as a bit more size and scope were the result. The Connemara
entered and remained an integral part of the equine community,
spreading good will wherever they traveled, including the
United States. The breed has built a solid and lasting reputation
as a trustworthy, versatile, athletically talented, good-natured
and enjoyable horse. Heights have now gone beyond pony at
14.2 to horse at 14.3 or more. Although thought of mostly as
grey,additional colors include black,bay, brown,an occasional roan
or chestnut and the original but now scarce dun.*
Those who influenced Joan Latty - Friends
and Fans of the Connemara Breed
In the Pacific Northwest and West Coast regions Joan Latty was
influenced by many colleagues and admirers of the Connemara.
The long list includes but is certainly not limited to Donna
Huntsman of Keno, Oregon who stands the fine stallion Keely
Shay, line bred from Potiquimi Castle Beau Geste. Also to be
recognized is Connie Tuor and Custusha’ s Cashel Rock (“Rocky”
was the first Connemara model by Breyer in the United States).
Connie in many ways made the Connemara breed prominent
for decades in the Pacific Northwest. Other long time colleagues
include Sally Green of Balius Farm in Grass Valley, CA and Joan
Webster of Stonybrook Connemara in Napa, CA. In Oregon Sandi
Taylor of Skyview Farm in Canby was an important ally. Since
Joan was District Commissioner for years in Marin and Napa
Counties, CA, a large number of Pony Club members and ocer
from throughout the USA have become extended family to three
generations of the Latty family and their Potiquimi Farm bred
Connemaras. Cleme Reinhart, Betsy McCool and Weylin Meyer,
all of Bend, OR can confirm the quality of these horses, having
owned, ridden and trained them. Whether dressage, driving or
hunter/jumper, this ancient Irish breed has made a formidable
record of success in competition and often as a beloved family
companion.
Family Story: Present to Future
Joan Latty’s legacy as a breeder, rider, instructor and trainer is
secure and will carry forward through her son Derek, now part of
the Swan training team at Whip ‘n Spur Farm in Wilsonville, OR.
He is currently bringing along a bay Connemara jumper “Dewey’’
show name, Potiquimi Due Deliberation. Daughter Tori lives in
Kentucky with her daughter Rianna while another daughter, Kyra,
remains in Southern Oregon with her three year old Arabella.
Stallion Castle Beau Geste, Derek Latty and
Joan Latty
Best Friend Forever
Potiquimi Due Deliberation and Derek Latty,
2015
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Four generations will surely continue the Latty family tradition
of breeding and training their cherished Connemara ponies and
horses. After all, they can’t help it, they’re Irish!
This article is dedicated to Fredric Martin Latty,
July 10, 1935 -May 13, 2015
*Reference and quoted from: The American Connemara Pony
Society,Patricia Calkins Lightbody)
References for further reading on the Connemara Pony:
Out Of The Mist and Shrouded In Mist by Pat Lyne.
Another excellent source is The American Connemara Pony
Society by Patricia Calkins Lightbody.
Or simply search the web for “Connemara Ponies and Horses” to
learn more.
Castle Beau Geste - National Recognition
2007 ACPS Hall of Fame
Castle Beau Geste and Derek Latty - Dressage
February 25
March 25
Donida Farms
in Auburn, WA
starreshowjumping.com
(253) 255-8207
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CONGRATULATES 2016 YEAR END
DRESSAGE HIGH POINT WINNERS
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ANNOUNCES 2017 CALENDAR
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Dressage Calendar 2017
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Recognized Shows Highlights and Features
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Sacramento International
Gallery
Capital Colnardo and Audrey Coulter (USA).
Winner Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping Sacramento
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Catalina and Eduardo Menezes (BRA)
Second Place Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping Sacramento
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Choir & Color Guard
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Winner of the Lasher’s Elk Grove Dodge Chrysler Jeep Ram
Ride and Drive Guido Klatte Jr
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
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Del Mar International
Gallery
Fiona Sewell and Karl Ernst win the 2016 Onondarka Medal Finals
From left: Genoa Capito of CWD, Don Simington of Onondarka, trainer Nick Karazissis, Mrs.
and Mr. Sewell and Janelle Dewitt of PCHA
Photo by McCool Photography for West Palms Events
Guido Klatte Jr. and Coolio 23 win the blue in the nal class of the Del Mar
International Horse Show Welcome Week, the Grand Prix of the Pacic
Presented by The Competitive Equestrian. Presenting - Lorna Lowrie and
Danielle Ballard.
Photo by McCool Photography
Enrique Gonzales (MEX) and Chacna
Winner Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping Del Mar
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Eduardo Menezes and Caruschka take home the win in the Del Mar
Charity Presented by The Competitive Equestrian. Thank you to Shelter
to Soldier for another wonderful benet. - Presenting - Graham Bloem
Danielle Ballard and Taylor Spooner.
Photo by McCool Photography
Quarry Ridge Farm Show Dates 2017
May 6, 2017 - Friendship Series Spring Show
June 3, 2017 - Friendship Series Summer Show
October 7, 2017 - Friendship Series Fall Show
Contact: Julia Richard: juliacookrichard@gmail.com or 360-909-8605
www.quarryridgefarm.com for entry forms
Contact: Laurie Freeman Swanson: lfsfreemanfarm@molalla.net or 503-829-2528
FREEMAN FARM
Lake Oswego Hunt Show Dates 2017
Sunday, March 12: Daylight Savings/Spring Forward HJ Schooling Show
Sunday, June 25: Oswego Classic HJ Schooling Show
Sunday, August 13: Summer Fun HJ Schooling Show
Saturday, September 16: 9th Annual Nancy Wild Medal Finals, Lake Oswego Hunt (for qualied riders)
Contact: Janice Weis: weisjl@msn.com or 503-961-2103
www.lakeoswegohunt.com for entry forms
2017 VENUES AND SHOW DATES
The Friendship Series of horse shows was established in 2005 to oer inclusive, competitive, professional
and friendly one day shows with a point system to honor riders on a local level. All aliated F/S shows
emphasize safety, fun and aordability. Points earned (recorded with a modest membership fee) celebrate
rider and horse performance along with horse stewardship. No longer do riders need to enter many divisions
and classes at a horse show to achieve success at year’s end.
You may join at any time at any of the Friendship Series shows to start.
The Friendship Series oers members a chance to earn points at any Friendship Series show throughout the
season and be honored at our celebratory annual banquet. The Series awards 10 of the highest point earners
(and one High Point) with special awards and recognition.
Freeman Farm Horse Show Dates 2017
May 20, 2017
August 5, 2017
W W W . W E S T P A L M S E V E N T S . C O M
SAVE THE DATE
2017 SHOW SCHEDULE
SANTA BARBARA
SURFSIDE CLASSIC
Feb 22 - 26, Santa Barbara, CA
SANTA BARBARA
SUNSHINE CLASSIC
March 1 - 5, Santa Barbara, CA
CENTRAL CALIFORNIACENTRAL CALIFORNIA
WELCOME CLASSIC
March 8 - 12, Paso Robles, CA
CENTRAL CALIFORNIA
ZINFANDEL CLASSIC
March 15 - 19, Paso Robles, CA
LA EQUESTRIAN FESTIVAL
April 20 - 23, Burbank, CAApril 20 - 23, Burbank, CA
96
TH
ANNUAL
FLINTRIDGE HORSE SHOW
April 27 - 30, La Cañada Flintridge, CA
DEL MAR NATIONAL
May 2 - 7, Del Mar, CA
CENTRAL CALIFORNIA
MEMORIAL DAY CLASSIC
MEMORIAL DAY CLASSIC
May 24 - 28, Paso Robles, CA
CENTRAL CALIFORNIA CLASSIC
May 31 - June 4, Paso Robles, CA
HUNTINGTON BEACH
SURF CLASSIC
July 6 - 9, Huntington Beach, CA
HUNTINGTON BEACH
SUMMER CLASSIC
August 10 - 13, Huntington Beach, CA
FLINTRIDGE AUTUMN CLASSIC
Sept 28 - Oct 1, La Cañada Flintridge, CA
SACRAMENTO INTERNATIONAL
WELCOME WEEKWELCOME WEEK
Sept 27 - Oct 1, Rancho Murieta, CA
SACRAMENTO INTERNATIONAL
WORLD CUP WEEK
October 4 - 8, Rancho Murieta, CA
DEL MAR INTERNATIONAL
WELCOME WEEK
October 11 - 15, Del Mar, CAOctober 11 - 15, Del Mar, CA
DEL MAR INTERNATIONAL
WORLD CUP WEEK
October 18 - 22, Del Mar, CA
DEL MAR INTERNATIONAL
SEASON FINALE
October 25 - 29, Del Mar, CA
CENTRAL CALIFORNIACENTRAL CALIFORNIA
FALL CLASSIC
November 1 - 5, Paso Robles, CA
CENTRAL CALIFORNIA
OAK TREE CLASSIC
November 8 - 12, Paso Robles, CA
P H O T O : K R I S T I N L E E P H O T O G R A P H Y
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
Central California Fall Classic
Gallery
Mandy Porter and Coral Reef Follow Me II
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Adult Amateur Working Hunter 50 and Over
Champion Gillett Brescia (L), Reserve Champion
Jenny Calandra (R) with Marc Grock.
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Six and Seven Year Old Jumper Classic winner
Soehnke Theymann and Cypress VF
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Cia and Alicia Jovais Color
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Double Play and Missy Froley
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Jennifer Rawlings
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Guy Thomas and Jonkheer Z
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Maritime and John French
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Winner of the $1,000 Highland Farms
Children’s-Adult Amateur Hunter Derby
Athabasca and Anne Marie Mueller
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
Central California Oak Tree Classic
Gallery
Augusta Iwasaki and Illusion
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Jason Foster
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Camerone and Lindsay Archer
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Bees Knees and Holly Kilkam-Charlebois
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Between The Lines and Gabriella Goshtigian
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Cruzin and Avery Lambert
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Winner of the $25,000 USHJA International
Hunter Derby Tivoli Z & John French
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Winner of the Highland Farms Children’s - Adult
Amateur Hunter Derby Lauren Aubert on Terra
Hornero with Trainer Beverly Jovais, Taylor
Spooner, Marc Groc & Asst Trainer Shannon Beck
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
Highland Farms Children’s - Adult Amateur
Hunter Derby 2nd place nisher Gillett Brescia
and Czolitude.
Photo by Alden Corrigan Media
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
The Proper Care and Maintenance of Your
(New) Saddle and Accessories
by Jochen Schleese, CMS, CSFT, CSE
©Saddlefit 4 Life® 2016. All Rights Reserved
Y
ou have hopefully done some research and know what
you need to look for when youre looking to find a
saddle for your horse that will fit you and fit your horse.
You’ve spent a lot of money. So - as with anything, taking
proper care of your leather goods will greatly enhance their
appearance and lifespan. This is true no matter what brand
of saddle or accessories you are using. Nowadays, saddles are
considered investments, and with the proper ‘tune ups’ should
last 15-20 years (for a good quality, adjustable saddle that
fits the rider and can be re-fitted to the horse as necessary. )
Adjustments are not just referring to reflocking; the tree needs
to be adjustable in both angle and width at the gullet plate!
Maintenance refers not only to the o
bvious visual upkeep of repairing stitches, replacing billets,
and addressing fit issues. One of the greatest misconceptions
has been with the correct use of saddle soaps. Saddle soaps are
basically exactly what their names imply: soaps, and as such are
to be used for cleansing only. In fact, soap - which is basic, and
sweat - which is acidic, are the two greatest enemies of leather
if they are not removed. The reason that saddle soap is used is
to rid the leather of accumulated sweat and grime which, if left
on, will result in the leather becoming brittle and cracking. It
is important to keep your saddle clean so that it doesn’t irritate
your horses hide. Sometimes people don’t take the soap off the
saddle once they clean it – and that is simply wrong!
Those soaps containing glycerines or built-in moisturizers
are beneficial only in that they serve to remove somewhat less
of the natural lubricants of the leather during washing. But
think of yourselves - after you wash your hair you rinse out
the shampoo when it has done its job, and after you wash your
hands, you rinse off the soap. More often than not, either a
conditioner or a hand lotion is applied to return some of the
moisture to the skin that the soap has removed. Soap will
eat away at the tan. Today’s leathers will get destroyed by
unremoved soap faster because there are more chemicals in the
soap.
Leather is essentially just skin which has been treated
(“tanned”), and skin is made of 70-80% water. Even after the
skin has been tanned into leather, a moisture content of about
25% is retained. In the past, leather was tanned over a 6-month
period and was more durable, but nowadays the tanning
process takes only about six weeks. Every time you wash or
clean your saddle, you need to rinse the leather off and then
apply your moisturizer. Cow hide is much like our skin, except
that it cannot replenish its moisture content itself and needs
you to do it.
After the soap has been rinsed off (even those containing
glycerine) the leather should have some sort of moisturizer
applied to it to return some of the natural lubricants, since
it is no longer a “living” system, able to replenish itself. We
highly recommend a leather cream without any cleaning
ingredients (soaps) which can effectively be used an all leather
items you may have. Leather oil can be used as a one-time
application over the entire saddle or other tack if you wish
to darken the original colour. On the saddle it should only
be used thereafter on the panel as a lubricant, since the wool
will soak up any excess. Used on the seat, it will soak through
and onto the laminated and glued layers of the tree, possibly
resulting in the eventual breakage of the tree, should you have
an English spring tree. Even with saddles built on other trees,
we don’t recommend you apply oil more often. As a rule, oil
should not be used anywhere the leather comes into contact
with your person (breeches, gloves) as it tends to discolour
these materials. In addition, oil on the flaps leads to such a
softening of the leather as to make them too flexible to fulfill
their purpose. Make sure you use products that are meant for
leather. Olive oil belongs in salads, baby oil belongs on babies -
not on leather!
Ideally, saddles and tack should be cleaned after every use. At
the least, they should be given a quick cleaning (wipe over) after
each use, with a thorough cleaning once a week. If you are
going to store your saddle or tack over a longer period of time,
keep it in a place preferably at room temperature, but never
cooler than 5 degrees Celsius, and at a humidity of 30-40% to
retain the suppleness of the leather. Do not worry if it appears
mildewy when you take it out - this is merely an indication that
the leather is still alive, and still has enough moisture content
to be attractive to mildew! Giving it a good wash and applying
a leather moisturizer will soon restore the original looks.
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
Froley / Sereni
Wedding
by Ashley Matchett Woods, The Equestrian’s Concierge
The Sereni Family Tradition expands again to include the
family of Missy Froley, trainer, rider, and owner of Hunter Bay
Farm.
On July 9, 2016, Missy Froley and RJ Sereni celebrated their
wedding with family, friends, and clients on Shelter Island, San
Diego, CA. An intimate gathering, the seaside-themed event
was expertly presented at the Kona Kai Resort with starfish-
topped cupcakes, and flowers accented with succulents and
coral. Clear skies and the sparkling harbor captured perfectly
the couples style: fun and casual – yet elegant and meaningful
with a nod to tradition.
“We love the horses and we get to do that everyday – we
wanted the other side of our lives, how we vacation, and
that’s at the beach.” – Missy & RJ
Most of the 100 or so guests came for the whole weekend with
activities hosted by the families. Poolside cabanas reserved an
entire side of the resort and made for a feeling of a large family
vacation. RJ’s Uncle, Larry Buck was ordained at the couples
request to be the ociate – his home being the very first time
Missy made the acquaintance of RJ’s family.
The union is a testament to the love and commitment of
the couples 8-year relationship -- as each built a business full
of hard work, hectic schedules, and time on the road in the
competitive equestrian industry. Originally from Southern
California, Missy has been a professional rider for two decades.
In recent years, she has built one of Northern Californias
pre-eminent training and show barns, Hunter Bay Farm and
has captured the blue in national and international-level
competition.
Missy and her parents, Julie and Craig Froley
Julie and I see Missy’s success as complete. She has
found someone who understands her life’s passion” –
Craig Froley
Missy and RJ
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
Toes in the sand, the couple were wed at an alter draped
with the mother of the bride’s wedding veil
Richard “RJ” Sereni is the eldest son to Debbi and Richard
Sereni, pillars of tradition and success in the Hunter/Jumper
and Western communities. Each is a successful trainer,
instructor, and clinician. Best man and brother Matthew
-- married last year to Carly Bechtel Sereni with whom he
owns Sterling View Farm – is a top rider and trainer too.
Having grown up in the family business, RJ, in his customary
understated style, has forged his own way -- not as a pro rider,
but as a highly regarded farrier and blacksmith, respected for
his background as a true horseman and artistic metallurgist.
Sereni Family Portrait
“I hit that jackpot in daughters-in-law!” – Debbi Sereni
The Matron of Honor, Rachel Yorke Fields, another successful
equestrienne, owns Sandhaven Farm with husband, Jeff Fields.
Along with the brides father and the best man, she gave the
couple what they describe as their favorite wedding gifts: the
heartfelt speeches and expressions of love and support on this
special day.
Missy, Rachel, Mia Sereni groom’s sister and Sadie Froley
bride’s niece. Missy’s nephew Finn walked Mia and Sadie
down the aisle.
Gideon, Missy’s dog
with wedding leash
Missy’s and her clients celebrate.
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
O3 Animal Health Minute Tip
The Esophagus and The Stomach
Meredith Kahn, MS
Equine Nutrition Consultant
O|3Animal Health, LLC.
After digestion begins in the mouth, the esophagus acts as
a one-way tube that transports food from the mouth to the
stomach. Food moves through the esophagus via muscular
contractions by both striated and smooth muscle types.
The tissue in the esophagus does not secrete any saliva or
mucous, therefore movement depends largely upon saliva
from the mouth. The cardiac sphincter, which separates the
esophagus from the stomach, is a one-way valve and the
mechanism preventing the ability to regurgitate. Therefore, if
horses ingest any sort of toxin or too much feed at one time, it
must pass through their entire system before it is eliminated.
The stomach can be divided into two
main section based on tissue type,
separated by a clearly visible junction
called the margo plicatus. The proximal
stomach, closer to the esophagus, is
composed of non-secreting cells call
non-glandular tissue. Conversely,
the distal stomach closer to the small
intestine, is made up of cells that
secrete hydrochloric acid and mucous.
This tissue is known as glandular
tissue. Moving from the cardiac
sphincter towards the small intestines,
the pH of the stomach decreases,
meaning that the environment
becomes more acidic.
While the glandular tissue secretes
hydrochloric acid, it also secretes
mucous, which acts to protect the
tissue from ulceration. The non-
glandular tissue does not have any
secretory action and is therefore more
susceptible to ulcer development,
particularly just along the margo
plicatus. This area resides close to
acid production and is consequently
a common site of ulceration in the
equine stomach.
FYI: Ingested fat remains untouched
in the esophagus and stomach.
Nevertheless, adding fat to the diet can
slow the process of gastric emptying
and, therefore have an effect on the
rate at which carbohydrate and protein
move out of the stomach. Fat digestion
itself does not begin until the small
intestine.
Questions? kathleen@
o3animalhealth.com
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
Building Your Team
Part 3
By Anne Kursinski
T
he second most important member of your team
is your groom. Ideally, you want someone with
experience as a groom. You need a person whose
judgment you feel you can trust and who will communicate
clearly and openly with you. They often spend the most time
with your horse. You need someone who has horse sense,
who is kind and not abusive, yet can have needed discipline.
It needs to be a person your horse likes and respects, yet is
not afraid of.
A top groom instinctively knows how to move around a
horse. He or she watches the horse in the turn-out and in
the stall, and know how they move, eat, and sleep. They
need to pay attention to the feed, supplements, and amount
of hay the horse eats and how much water he drinks, as well
as keeping an eye on the weight and fitness of your horse.
If necessary, your groom also needs to be able to bandage
your horses’ legs properly. They should know what your
horses’ legs look like as far as any filling, heat, old injuries,
or anything knew that might pop up. Knowing how to pack
the feet when the ground is hard and how to use ice boots or
other therapies is important as well.
Today there are so many machines that one can use on
horses. Can they use a magnetic blanket, foot pad, laser,
Magna Wave, or ultra sound? If there are therapies your
groom is not familiar with they need to be open and hungry
to learn about them.
This openness to learn goes along with your groom
working very closely with your vet. I love having a consistent
groom that knows my horse inside and out, who has worked
with my vet, and everything is in sync. They should be able
to jog your horse for the vet while you and your vet watch.
They should help hold him if your vet does any work.
After that, they should be totally focused on the “follow up”
after the vet has treated your horse, be it hand walk for two
or three days, or bandaged, and what medications might be
administrated.
I speak directly with my vets and I always try to be present
if possible for exams. I need a top groom or manager taking
notes and reporting back to me regarding what went on
if I cannot be there in person. I have to have people I have
confidence in to know my horse has the best care and follow
up; that no stone goes unturned.
Your groom needs to know many other things as well; how
to longe a horse safely and properly, how to put studs or
caulks in the shoes if jumping on grass. They must notice if
a shoe is sprung or loose. Can he keep your horse trimmed
up, and body clip and braid if necessary?
Of course, other professionals can do these things. But a
top groom will want to do it all and beyond. Can he or she
drive a truck and/or trailer? If not, do they know where your
horse ships best or if the horse has a shipping issue?
After all of the care in the barn, can your groom get your
horse to the show ring on time, beautifully turned out?
Horses feel better and like they are winners when they are
turned out well and taken care of properly. You will also feel
like a winner when your horse looks amazing; when all of
the details are taken care of and your horse is waiting for you
at the ring with your sharp groom.
For me, my grooms play a huge role, whether at Olympic
Games, World Cup Finals, or at home. We have a system as
to how I like things done. We can communicate well during
good times as well as stressful ones. My horses’ well being is
the most important thing.
My grooms know that he or she is there to support us and
get the best performance out of us. We are all on the same
team, going for the same goal of excellence. The groom has a
huge part in that performance, even though they are behind
the scenes.
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
During the 2015 winter competition season, a new hot-spot for
equestrian shopping popped up on the show jumping circuit.
Equis Boutique partnered with selected luxury brands to piece
together a one-stop shopping experience like no other. Through
mobile shopping at horse shows along the East Coast of the U.S.
and through their online store, Equis Boutique has introduced
several popular European brands to the North American market.
Nearly two years after their rst pop-up boutique made a name
for itself at the Winter Equestrian Festival in Wellington, Florida,
Equis Boutique is well-known as a popular place to nd the
highest quality products. The boutique carries the best from
apparel brands including Parlanti, KASK, Manfredi and Kingsland
Equestrian. In addition, Equis Boutique boasts quality tack from
Dy’on, horse boots from Kentucky Horsewear, and much more.
As the busy spring horse show season approaches and the
shopping lists continue to grow, Equis Boutique has stylish
choices to t any occasion. Shop these looks at Equis Boutique
pop-up stores or at Equisboutique.com:
Dress Your Best With Equis Boutique
By Lindsay Brock
Show-Ring Ready
Star Lady Swarovski
Carpet Helmet by KASK
Manfredi Show Coat
with interchangeable collars
Manfredi Monte Bello
Non-Slip Breeches
Aspen Dress Boots
by Parlanti
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
By Lindsay Brock
Out For A School
Manfredi
Seaside Blue Shirt
Equestrian Street Style
Dogma Chrome
Light Helmet
by KASK
Manfredi Santa Clara
Breeches
Miami Essentials
Field Boots by
Parlanti
Parlanti Paddock
Boots
Manfredi Belt
Classic Kingsland
Body Warmer
Colby Kielman, Broker
Licensed in Oregon as
Michelle Colby Kielman
(800) 772-7284 •
www.HarcourtsOROP.com
79+ acre ranch, 50.1 acres ood
irrigated. Zoned EFU. Home, shop
and arena sit on a knoll overlooking the
valley. Gated entry, bass pond, 3796
sqft, 4 bedroom, 3 full and 2 half bath
home. Covered arena, 2 tack rooms
and a viewing area, fully insulated
shop with 3162 sqft, 5 roll-up doors,
compressed air & dust collector, wine
room that is temperature & climate
controlled. Completely fenced and
has great hay pastures, riding trails, two
ponds, seasonal creek. $1,890,000
79+ ACRE RANCH!
503.663.1515
ColumbiaEquine.com
Columbia Equine Hospital
Technology. Experience. Compassion.
Columbia Equine Hospital offers a full
range of ambulatory, in-
clinic, and referral
services.
Your equine athlete or companion will
receive quality care from our expert team at
our state-of-the-art equine hospital or at
your farm.
Scott W Hansen, DVM • Megan Rioux-Forker, DVM, CVA • Greg Schmid, DVM
David Klugh, DVM, FAVD
27841 SE Orient Dr • Gresham, OR 97080
 .FC. A 
Canter Lane
Dressage
Committed to your success
Boarding
Training Lessons
Lesson horses available
Childrens lessons oered
Breeder of quality German
Riding Ponies
Young stock available
Contact
Patty Russell
For Training, Lessons & Sale Information
canterlanedressage@comcast.net
360-790-4172
By Stacey Sikorski
A Professional Groom for 25+ Years
Trusted On-site Equine Clipping
Serving the Greater Puget Sound Area
To schedule: 425.501.5997 or eqclippingservices@gmail.com
View Stacey’s work and learn more:
equineclipping.com
•  Body Clipping
•  Trace Clipping
•  Show Clipping
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for values under
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Olympia WA 98502
CENTURYLINK CENTER OMAHA
MARCH 29 - APRIL 2, 2017
TICKETS NOW ON SALE
OmahaWorldCup2017.com
FOR VIP SEATING CALL 402.930.3079
LONGINES FEI WORLD CUP
JUMPING FINAL
OMAHA 2017
TM
T
he red carpets were rolled away until next year, the horses
have moved on to their next destination, and champions
were crowned as The Royal, Canadas most beloved
horse show, came to a close in November. The 94th annual Royal
Agricultural Winter Fair played host to another iconic edition of
the Royal Horse Show in the heart of downtown Toronto where
the stars of horse sport basked in the pomp and circumstance that
defines one of North Americas last remaining traditional indoor
horse shows.
It’s not often that one sees tuxedos standing by schooling rings
or ball gowns waiting at the ingate, but at The Royal, formality is
embraced and upholding tradition is welcomed by those fortunate
enough to experience The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair.
Heres a look back at who was there, who won what, and who will
be seeking to defend their championship titles in 2017:
McLain Ward Goes Four for Four at The Royal
One man who is no stranger to being the subject of cheers in the
Ricoh Coliseum is McLain Ward. Three-time Olympic medalist and
now four-time grand prix winner at The Royal, Ward topped the
$130,270 Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping Toronto in the irons of
his 2016 Rio Olympic mount, HH Azur. With his wife, Lauren, and
daughter, Lilly, leading the cheers from the stands, Ward views The
Royal as much more than just another horse show.
“It’s like my vacation every year,” he said. “I actually enjoy it more
than a vacation!
“This venue has been very good to me, so it’s like coming home,”
continued Ward. “When you have a horse like Azur, it makes life a
lot easier and you just try to stay out of her way. She normally gives
a great performance and, every once in a while, I don’t mess it up.”
With a new Longines DolceVita time piece on his wrist, Ward has
his sights set firmly on making an appearance at the 2017 Longines
FEI World Cup™ Jumping Final to be held from March 29 to April 2
in Omaha, Nebraska. With yet another win in Toronto to his credit,
Ward is well on his way to securing a starting place in the line-up.
Charlie Johnstone Welcomes the World
to the Royal Horse Show
The Royal played host to the $130,270 Longines FEI World Cup™
Jumping Toronto, one of only four Canadian events included in the
Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping North American League, for the
second time in 2016. As gaining valuable points towards qualifying
for the 2017 Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping Final becomes
increasingly pivotal, the Royal Horse Show was an important stop
on show schedules for riders around the world hoping to qualify.
Charlie Johnstone, CEO of The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair,
who is also in his second year at the helm of the event, was quick to
speak to the importance of the Royal Horse Show being part of the
Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping North American League.
“We are thrilled to have the Longines World Cup Jumping in
Toronto,” said Johnstone. “The Royal has a long tradition and history
of world-class events. To have an event of this status and to have
these competitors and their horses here participating and putting on
such a world-class event in Toronto is what The Royal is all about.
As we move forward, we want to continue this partnership. Its been
great for the event, and great for our fans.”
David Will Thrills in Royal Debut
With nine countries represented at the Royal Horse Show, world-
class talent was common within the international show jumping
By Lindsay Brock/Jump Media
Who’s Who
of the 94th
Annual Royal
Horse Show
Charlie Johnstone (left), CEO of The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, congratulated McLain Ward on his win
alongside Connie Sawyer, Manager of the Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping North American League and Iain
Gilmour, Chairman of the Royal Horse Show following the $130,270 Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping Toronto.
Photo by Ben Radvanyi Photography
McLain Ward of the
United States went
four for four, claiming
the Wednesday night
feature for the fourth
year in a row. He and
HH Azur successfully
defended their title
in the $130,270
Longines FEI World
Cup™ Jumping
Toronto.
Photo by Jump
Media
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
division. However, it was still possible for a newcomer to jump into
several top placings, as David Will of Germany proved. Will scored
back-to-back victories in the $35,000 International Accumulator
riding Cento du Rouet and Friday night’s $50,000 Weston Canadian
Open aboard Calista. Adding to his break-out star status, Will had
never even set foot on Canadian soil prior to his Royal Horse Show
debut.
“My first time in Canada couldn’t have been any better!” said Will.
“It’s a great show, especially for us riders. There’s a really good crowd
that pushes us to do our best. You feel that all of the people are
involved in horse sport, and they really know if you are doing well.
It’s just great!”
Will’s two wins were just a small piece of the widespread success
enjoyed by international riders at The Royal. Of the nine nations that
were represented in the international show jumping division, four
different national anthems played as riders from Germany, Ireland,
The Netherlands, and the United States all enjoyed victories.
Nick Skelton and Big Star Dazzle at The Royal
Great Britains Nick Skelton has a long history of competing at the
Royal Horse Show, dating back to the late 1970s. Almost 40 years
later, the newly crowned Olympic Champion arrived in Toronto
with none other than his gold medal mount, Big Star. While Skelton
considers The Royal to be one of his favorite shows, his 13-year-
old Dutch Warmblood stallion is surprisingly unseasoned when it
comes to competing indoors.
“He hasn’t jumped indoors very much, funny enough,” said Skelton,
noting that The Royal was Big Star’s only FEI-sanctioned North
American competition of the entire year, indoors or out. “This is
only his fourth show indoors. He came here when he was eight years
old and I wouldn’t say that indoors is really his forte, but I was very
pleased with him both times.”
While it may have only been Big Star’s fourth time showing indoors
in his entire career, he and Skelton did not disappoint, posting
several top finishes including a third place finish behind McLain
Ward and Kent Farrington in the $130,270 Longines FEI World
Cup™ Jumping Toronto.
Tiany Foster Returns to her Royal Roots
Tiffany Foster, who hails from North Vancouver, BC, has been
steadily ascending to the top of the international show jumping
scene for the past several years and, this year, she brought some of
that success home to Canada. Alongside her fellow 2016 Rio Olympic
teammate Amy Millar, Foster headlined the list of Canadian show
jumping athletes at The Royal.
Foster received a special homecoming at The Royal as, exactly
15 years earlier, the up-and-coming rider had won both the 2001
Running Fox CET Medal Final as well as the Jump Canada Medal, the
two most prestigious equitation finals held in Canada, at the 2001
Royal Horse Show. Her return as a two-time Olympian following a
15-year absence was met with roaring approval from the fans.
“There is always great atmosphere at The Royal,” said Foster. “The
Canadian crowd always gets behind us, and raises the roof in Toronto!”
While at the Royal Horse Show, Foster, ranked 21st in the world,
was presented with the Whitaker Award, given to the highest-ranked
Canadian competing at The Royal. She also accepted the 2016 Jump
Canada ‘Owner of the Year’ award on behalf of her owners, Andy
and Carlene Ziegler of Artisan Farms, in a special presentation held
prior to the $130,270 Longines FEI World Cup™ Jumping Toronto.
David Will (left) of
Germany, pictured
on Calista, scored
back-to-back wins
in international
show jumping
competition in his
Royal Horse Show
debut.
Photo by Jump
Media
Nick Skelton (right)
thrilled show
jumping fans with
an appearance at
the Royal Horse
Show aboard his
partner Big Star,
the mount that
carried him to the
2016 Olympic gold
medal.
Photo by Ben
Radvanyi
Photography
Ian Millar Takes Record 12th Greenhawk
Canadian Show Jumping Championship
One rider who always stirs up enthusiastic reactions from
spectators at The Royal is Canada’s own Ian Millar. The ten-time
Canadian Olympian proved his crowd-favorite status yet again
by winning a record 12th Greenhawk Canadian Show Jumping
Championship title.
Two-time Canadian Olympian Tiany Foster returned to home soil to
compete at The Royal for the rst time in 15 years.
Photo by Jump Media
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
Having last won the Greenhawk Canadian Show Jumping
Championship in 2014 riding his London Olympic mount Star
Power, Millar took the title this time around aboard Dixson. The
win marked an incredible comeback following two sinus surgeries
that sidelined Dixson earlier in the year and ultimately kept Millar
from competing at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games.
“Most every country has a national championship, and it’s always
a matter of great pride to the rider that wins it,” said Millar, 69. “We
have the best indoor competition in the world right here at the Royal
Agricultural Winter Fair, and that’s a real honor.”
While Millar was pleased with his win, he acknowledged an even
bigger source of pride when his children, Jonathon and Amy Millar,
both finished in the top five in the Greenhawk Canadian Show
Jumping Championship standings.
“I’m most pleased about their results - they did a great job,”
concluded Millar.
Eventing Sensation Michael Jung Claims
Horseware Indoor Eventing Challenge
While show jumping headlined much of the Royal Horse Show,
the event is a true representation of multi-disciplinary competition
at the highest level. The $20,000 Horseware Indoor Eventing
Challenge welcomed true eventing royalty to Toronto. Reigning
Olympic champion Michael Jung of Germany claimed victory in
his $20,000 Horseware Indoor Eventing Challenge debut after
pocketing individual gold and team silver medals at the 2016 Rio
Olympics.
Jung welcomed the challenges of indoor eventing over courses
designed by Captain Mark Phillips of Great Britain, which combined
technical show jumping fences with thrilling cross country obstacles
inside the Ricoh Coliseum. Making his win even more impressive,
Jung pulled off victory with a catch ride when his own mount was
unable to make the trip. Having selected his mount from videos of
three horses, Jung only sat on his winning mount, Cruising Guy, for
the first time a few hours before the event.
“I really liked this show,” said Jung. “I’ve ridden many of Mark’s
courses outside, but it’s totally different inside. He did a great job
and it turned out to be good competition.”
Megan Lane Dances to Debutant Victory
Canadian Olympic dressage rider Megan Lane not only checked
competing at the Royal Horse Show off her bucket list, but did so
in winning style. Fresh off their Olympic debut in Rio, Lane and
Caravella, her partner since her North American Young Rider
Championship days, won the $20,000 Royal Invitational Dressage
Cup, presented by Butternut Ridge.
Earning an impressive score of 76.75% riding to the same freestyle
she performed as part of Canadas silver medal team at the 2015 Pan
American Games in Toronto, Lane’s Royal Horse Show debut was
one to remember.
“It has been a lifelong dream of mine to compete at The Royal,” said
Lane. “To have this dream come true, on top of riding an amazing
test on the partner I’ve grown up with, is pretty surreal to me.”
With her successful outing in Toronto, Lane’s focus now shifts to
competing at the 2017 Reem Acra FEI World Cup Final in Omaha,
Nebraska, next spring
Ian Millar, 69, (left)
won a record 12th
Greenhawk Canadian
Show Jumping
Championship title
riding Dixson at
the Royal Horse
Show. Photo by
Ben Radvanyi
Photography
Reigning Olympic
champion Michael
Jung (right) of Germany
claimed victory in the
$20,000 Horseware
Indoor Eventing Chal-
lenge riding Cruising
Guy at The Royal.
Photo by Ben Radvanyi
Photography
Canada’s own Megan
Lane won the $20,000
Royal Invitational Dres-
sage Cup, presented by
Butternut Ridge, at The
Royal.
Photo by Ben Radvanyi
Photography
3X-2016_LM_CompetitiveEquestrian_8.37x10.5in.indd 3 21/06/16 11:26
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EQUISPORTS
THE SEASON BEGINS THIS MARCH:
Spring Series: March 22 – April 15, 2017
Prize List available soon! Sign up to receive one at showpark.com
EQUITATION – 6 MEDAL FINALS:
USHJA Hunterdon Equitation Cup, West Coast
CPHA Medal Finals
CPHA Foundation Equitation Championships
ASPCA Maclay Regionals
USEF Talent Search Finals, West
WCE Medal Finals
HUNTERS – PROGRAMS & FINALS:
FREE! New in 2017: Young Hunter Age Group Classes & Classics, reduced stall fees
$40,000+ CPHA Green Hunter 3’ & 3’3” Incentive Program Qualiers & Finals
$25,000 USHJA/WCHR Hunter Spectacular
New in 2017: $25,000 Blenheim EquiSports Young Hunter Championships
13 USHJA Sanctioned Hunter Derbies
3 WCHR Sanctioned Member Events
US Junior Hunter National Championships, West
Sally B. Wheeter US National Hunter Breeding Championships, West
West Coast Pony Hunter Challenge
#THEPLACETOBE
FOR DEVELOPING
HORSES & RIDERS
and so much more...
BLENHEIM
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JUMPERS – PROGRAMS & FINALS:
FREE! Young Jumper Age Group Classes & YJC Qualiers, reduced stall fees
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$65,000 Interactive Mortgage Horses 10 & Under Futurity Series & Final
Longines FEI World Cup
TM
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Young Jumper Championship West Coast Finals
Show Jumping Hall of Fame Junior/Amateur-Owner Qualiers & West Coast Final
USHJA Zone 9/10 Jumper Championships*
*Pending Approval
20 USEF - USHJA - PCHA Sanctioned Hunter-Jumper Shows
APP
SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO • DEL MAR • LAS VEGAS
SHOWPARK.COM
#THEPLACETOBE
FOR DEVELOPING
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 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
F
rom Olympic athlete to trusted trail horse, every equestrian
wants the very best for their equine partner. Palm Beach
Equine Clinic (PBEC) of Wellington, Florida, offers the
best in care for sport horses of every discipline. As an industry
leader in equine veterinary care, PBEC features a renowned
list of 30 doctors who are experts in their respective fields. The
veterinarians and staff are valued throughout the industry for
their advanced level of care and steadfast commitment to both
horses and their owners.
PBEC’s goal is to keep horses healthy and happy while extending
their performance careers through innovative veterinary services
and with the support of state-of-the-art diagnostic imaging and
surgical equipment.
At Palm Beach Equine Clinic, we are extremely dedicated to
our clients and the well-being of their horses,” said Dr. Scott
Swerdlin, President of Palm Beach Equine Clinic. “We pride
ourselves on offering cutting-edge technology and diagnostics to
ensure that the health of the horse comes first.”
Among the extensive list of services offered by Palm Beach
Equine Clinic are:
24-hour emergency coverage, intensive care available
365 days a year
Comprehensive surgical and medical resources at a
state-of-the-art hospital
On-site advanced diagnostic imaging including a
standing MRI unit, a Nuclear Scintigraphy gamma ray
camera, ultrasonography, and radiography
Preeminent lameness examinations and follow-up
Extensive pre-purchase evaluations
Dentistry services
Preventative medicine and Wellness programs
Alternative medicine services including Chiropractic
and Acupuncture therapies
Advanced Diagnostic Imaging
Palm Beach Equine Clinic prides itself as a consistent leader in
horse sport medicine and provides the most advanced equine
diagnostic imaging services for clients. Currently, PBEC has a
standing MRI unit, MiE gamma ray camera, Digital Radiography,
Video Endoscopy, and a bevy of additional diagnostic equipment.
Coupled with advanced imaging technology available on-
site, PBEC is fortunate to work directly with world-renowned,
Board-Certified Radiologist, Dr. Sarah Puchalski. Dr. Puchalski’s
job requires a high level of specialization to properly review
imaging to produce comprehensive written reports for referring
veterinarians. In addition to her full-time position with PBEC,
Dr. Puchalski reads imaging cases for clinics all over the world.
“PBEC has a great case population and great equipment, which
is a huge bonus for someone doing what I do,” Dr. Puchalski
stated. “The equipment is exceptional, the technical staff is
excellent, and the case population of the region is obviously
amazing.”
PBEC proudly offers an updated Nuclear Scintigraphy lab
that houses the MiE Nuclear Scintigraphy gamma ray camera.
Nuclear Scintigraphy is typically used to diagnose injuries or
bone remodeling within the skeletal anatomy of the horse. This
specialized camera is equipped with sharper contours for precise
imaging that results in accurate lameness diagnosis.
Also known as bone scans, Nuclear Scintigraphy images are
very useful in defining multi-limb lameness origins for the hard
to diagnose, long-duration lameness cases. Those scans isolate
points of injury, which can then be identified further with other
diagnostic techniques, such as Digital Radiology and MRI.
In PBEC’s inviting MRI lab containing the innovative
Equine Standing MRI manufactured by Hallmarq, the clinics
veterinarians are able to scan the equine distal limb in a standing
position requiring only light sedation. MRI is very useful to
further define a suspected lameness origin by acquiring more
defined images of boney and soft tissue structures.
World-Class Surgeons, Cutting-Edge Technology, and Premier
Services Available for Multi-Discipline Sport Horses at
Palm Beach Equine Clinic
By Lauren Fisher
Palm Beach Equine Clinic on a beautiful South Florida night. Photo by Eques Solutions, Inc.
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
Emergency Services
In the event of an emergency, Palm Beach Equine Clinic clients
can rest easy knowing that they have some of the world’s best
surgeons and veterinarians at their disposal. PBEC is renowned
for its full-service surgical center and intensive care hospital
located in the heart of Wellington. Board-Certified surgeons,
primary care veterinarians, and skilled hospital technicians are
scheduled 24 hours a day, 365 days a year to treat, monitor, and
care for critical cases.
PBEC also offers the latest in surgical technology, as the
operating techniques are less invasive and result in faster recovery
times for the horse. PBEC’s surgical suite and staff is prepared to
handle all types of emergencies, day and night. The large team
of 30 veterinarians includes three Board-Certified Surgeons who
rotate on-call duties so every day is covered. With world-class
veterinarians and a full staff of highly trained technicians, both
clients and patients of PBEC are in the best hands possible.
Alternative Equine Therapies
While PBEC offers innovative conventional veterinary services
with the assistance of diagnostic tools and surgical equipment,
they also offer several alternative therapies, including
Chiropractic Manipulation and Acupuncture. When properly
applied by a trained practitioner, Alternative Medicine can be
used in conjunction with traditional sports medicine to optimize
health and increase the longevity of a performance horse’s career.
PBEC’s Dr. Richard Wheeler detailed how alternative medicine
can be used to improve a horses chance for success and treat
many different issues.
“The line between success and failure is very thin for
performance horses, and a lot of these alternative therapies can
be very useful to give the horse that little bit more,” Dr. Wheeler
explained. “Chiropractic and acupuncture are two alternative
therapies that PBEC offers. They are both conjunctive therapies
that can keep horses comfortable, happy and performing well.
“Both chiropractic manipulation and acupuncture can get the
horse moving a little bit better and can help to maintain some
minor chronic problems that they may have, therefore avoiding
more invasive treatments,” Dr. Wheeler continued. “These
therapies are used with the aim of keeping the horse supple and
moving with ease and helping the musculature to work correctly.
We work with the trainers to optimize muscle development so
that we can fix the problem and keep the horse moving forward
and performing at the top level.”
Veterinary Chiropractic Manipulation is thought to optimize
equine health by restoring normal joint motion, reversing mild
pathology, and helping to slow the progression of degenerative
joint and spine disease. Over the years, this therapy has become
a valuable adjunct for competition horses.
Acupuncture is a form of treatment used in both traditional
and classical Chinese medicine. It is based on the principle that
there are energetic pathways, or channels, throughout the body
that influence associated internal organs and structures. Energy
from these pathways surface at various points on the body,
identified as acupuncture points. Extremely fine gauge needles
are inserted at selected points, stimulating these points and
thereby activating the body’s natural healing abilities.
Chiropractic and Acupuncture therapies are complementary
treatments for lameness problems. Alternative methods do not
replace conventional veterinary medicine or surgery, but can be
very useful in maintaining top performance levels in the horse.
By Lauren Fisher
Preventative Equine Medicine
Regular, routine veterinary care is important to maintaining
equine health. Dental care, vaccinations, deworming, and
annual physical examinations keep horses healthy and can
identify problems early. It is very important that horse owners
have a veterinarian who is familiar with their horses and can
provide routine care.
PBEC President Dr. Scott Swerdlin takes pride in
offering cutting-edge technology and diagnostics.
Photo by Eques Solutions, Inc.
Dr. Natalia Novoa performs a chiropractic adjust-
ment. Photo by James Wooster
Dr. Janet Greeneld-Davis specializes in alternative
therapies such as acupuncture. Photo by James
Wooster
Dr. Tyler Davis enjoys the intricacies of dental care.
Photo by Eques Solutions, Inc.
Palm Beach Equine Clinic on a beautiful South Florida night. Photo by Eques Solutions, Inc.
 YOUR NEWS YOUR SPORT YOUR BUSINESS 
Proper dental care is essential to the well-being and peak
performance of every horse. Dental maintenance keeps horses
working well, performing well, and more importantly, eating
well. It is important to get the horses teeth examined and
regularly floated at least once a year and sometimes more
frequently in older horses.
The veterinarians of PBEC are available to visit clients at their
farms to perform thorough dental evaluations and “float” the
teeth – a term that refers to the veterinarian wearing down the
surface of the teeth, usually to remove sharp points or balance
out the tooth surface.
With PBEC’s advanced technology, the veterinarians are
also able to perform more progressive, specialized treatments
beyond routine dentistry. Veterinarians are able to perform
tooth extractions as needed for horses suffering from a tooth
abscess or fracture. With the surgical staff at PBEC, dental
surgeries, sinus surgeries, or similar procedures are easily
performed at the clinic.
Along with dental care, PBEC offers further preventative care
services, including worming protocols for parasite control, and
routine vaccinations. Preventative care is extremely important
to the health of every horse. Whether it is a top level show horse
or a backyard pet, the veterinarians of Palm Beach Equine Clinic
are here to help with all maintenance needs.
Palm Beach Equine Clinic provides experience, knowledge,
availability, and the very best care for its clients. Make Palm
Beach Equine Clinic a part of your team! To find out more,
please visit www.equineclinic.com or call 561-793-1599.
PBEC is renowned for its full-service surgical center and intensive care
hospital. Photo by Eques Solutions, Inc.
PBEC proudly offers an updated Nuclear Scintigraphy lab to diagnose
injuries or bone remodeling within the skeletal anatomy of the horse.
Photo by Jack Mancini
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82 www.EINw.org JaNuary 2017
CLUB NEWS
www.EINW.org
whereas the Champagne will be a three
day show. Last but not least we are super
excited about the dressage clinic series
with Anne Gribbons and Lilo Fore which
is scheduled for April 8 & 9, June 19 & 20,
October 21 & 22 and December 9 & 10th.
In early December Jo Renn, Dressage
Committee member and Volunteer
Coordinator/Asst. Show Manager
travelled to Lexington to attend the
USDF convention as the EI delegate.
While there she became a member of the
Awards Committee. She also reported
back that the USDF Individual PM annual
membership will increase from $75 to $90
effective 2018 but the GMO fees will stay
the same. The USDF has also started a new
Adult education program with a budget
of $27,000 designed to help GMO’s to
put on educational programs which we
can hopefully be a beneficiary of. A rule
change that will take effect December 1,
2016 will now allow shows to offer two
qualifying rides at each level each day. It
was also announced that Rancho Murieta
in California is being considered as a 2018
US Dressage finals site. USDF will do a
site visit in September 2017 in order to
determine if the site is acceptable.
Congratulation to all of our Year End
High Point winners! See separate one page
Ad featuring the winners.
Eventing Report
By Meika Decher
Tis the season for end of the year awards.
I just got home from the USEA meeting
in Florida, and while it was a long way to
travel, I walked away satisfied. Not only did
I reconnect with friends, but I also learned
a great deal. These meetings are not only
designed to get the administrative groups
together, but to also be educational and
entertaining for everyone.
At our more local level, the same thing
President’s Report
By Diana Axness
Happy New Year! I hope everyone has
had an enjoyable 2016 and met your horse
related New Years goals for 2016. If you
haven’t done so already, now is the time to
commit to your 2017 goals for you and your
equine partners. There are always things
we can improve on – whether it is moving
up a level, placing higher in competitions,
or learning new skills. Knowing what our
realistic goals are helps to shape how we
train and prepare for the year. Hopefully,
in 2017 EI will be offering the clinics and
competitions which will help you obtain
your goals.
As Equestrians Institute prepares for
the 2017 calendar of events, we would like
to welcome a new board member. At the
2016 annual meeting, Kathryn Lewis was
voted onto the EI board and will serve as
a dressage board member at large. Shes
been active with the dressage committee
and we look forward to her participation
at the board level. The rest of the 2017
board are the same loyal hard working
board members who served in 2016. So,
welcome Kathryn and thank you to all of
the rest of the EI board members!
Dressage Report
By Gunn Cooper
The EI Dressage Committee is very
excited about our upcoming show and
clinic schedule for 2017. We will start the
year off with a Learn to Scribe clinic on
February 11th taught by our own Teresa
Stewart. The two Schooling Show dates are
set for April 23 and May 21. Yeah, no March
show due to closure of the Bridle Tails Park
show area for some needed repairs. We are
not doing the LAperitif in 2017 but the long
standing tradition of Chablis/Beaujolais
(June 17 & 18) and the Champagne (July
8-10th) will continue. Note the change,
the Beaujolais will now be a two day show
Board of Directors
BoardofDirectors@einw.org
Diana Axness diana@einw.org
Trish Camozzi-Ekberg trish@einw.org
Gunn Cooper gunn@einw.org
Meika Decher meika@einw.org
Merridy Hance merridy@einw.org
Penny Leggott penny@einw.org
Kathryn Lewis kathryn@einw.org
Sarah Johnson sarah@einw.org
Chris Bredeson chris@einw.org
Laurie McLaughlin lauriemc@einw.org
Administration
Membership membership@einw.org
Bookkeeper bookkeeper@einw.org
Volunteers volunteers@einw.org
Grants grants@einw.org
Website/Email webmaster@einw.org
Driving Events & Clinic
driving@einw.org
Sarah Johnson sarah@einw.org
Diana Axness diana@einw.org
Merridy Hance merridy@einw.org
Leslie McGinnis leslie@einw.org
Eventing Horse Trials & Clinics
eventing@einw.org
Meika Decher meika@einw.org
Penny Leggott penny@einw.org
Heidi Hansen heidi@einw.org
Dressage Shows & Clinics
dressage@einw.org
Gunn Cooper gunn@einw.org
Markay Kerr markay@einw.org
Kathryn Lewis kathryn@einw.org
Peter Rothschild pgr@tsandm.com
Kaye Phaneuf phaneuf@canby.com
Sport Horse Breeding Shows & Clinics
Chris Bredeson chris@einw.org
Laurie McLaughlin lauriemc@einw.org
happens. Penny Leggott and myself will
represent Equestrians Institute at the
Area VII meeting in Portland. There is
still time for you to come out and join
us! The highlight of the meeting for me
will be the famous silent auction, as well
as a premiere talk by rider/trainer/sports
therapist Jen Verharen. Jen teaches at my
barn every month during the winter, and
I have a chance to see first hand, her skills
at bringing out the best in a rider. For me,
this is a must-go-to talk for anyone who
has riding goals and wants to achieve them.
No matter if you compete or not, Jen helps
everyone get more out of themselves and
their horses.
For 2017, we have BIG goals for EI
Eventing. We will help the WSHP build
JaNuary 2017 www.EINw.org 83
Board of Directors
BoardofDirectors@einw.org
Diana Axness diana@einw.org
Trish Camozzi-Ekberg trish@einw.org
Gunn Cooper gunn@einw.org
Meika Decher meika@einw.org
Merridy Hance merridy@einw.org
Penny Leggott penny@einw.org
Kathryn Lewis kathryn@einw.org
Sarah Johnson sarah@einw.org
Chris Bredeson chris@einw.org
Laurie McLaughlin lauriemc@einw.org
Administration
Membership membership@einw.org
Bookkeeper bookkeeper@einw.org
Volunteers volunteers@einw.org
Grants grants@einw.org
Website/Email webmaster@einw.org
Driving Events & Clinic
driving@einw.org
Sarah Johnson sarah@einw.org
Diana Axness diana@einw.org
Merridy Hance merridy@einw.org
Leslie McGinnis leslie@einw.org
Eventing Horse Trials & Clinics
eventing@einw.org
Meika Decher meika@einw.org
Penny Leggott penny@einw.org
Heidi Hansen heidi@einw.org
Dressage Shows & Clinics
dressage@einw.org
Gunn Cooper gunn@einw.org
Markay Kerr markay@einw.org
Kathryn Lewis kathryn@einw.org
Peter Rothschild pgr@tsandm.com
Kaye Phaneuf phaneuf@canby.com
Sport Horse Breeding Shows & Clinics
Chris Bredeson chris@einw.org
Laurie McLaughlin lauriemc@einw.org
a new intermediate cross country course,
and thus expand the ability for the site to
host a world class event. Furthermore, the
entire horse community, from mounted
shooters to hunter jumper riders, have
pitched in to help build a covered arena
at the park. This is incredibly exciting
news. The WSHP is not sitting around
maintaining the status quo, but instead,
they are expanding and developing the
site for all of us to use. We at EI Eventing
are so excited and proud to continue to
help the park!
Driving Report
By Sarah Johnson
A shiny new year ahead and so many
events to choose from! EI Driving has set
its event dates for 2017, and you’re invited to
join us for fun, fellowship, and unparalleled
carriage driving experiences at the Ethel
Events Center! Back by popular demand:
May 19-21 -- Everything-but-the-
Kitchen-Sink weekend, with open
schooling, clinician lessons, Dressage
Festival, Pleasure classes, and a one-day
Driving Trial
August 11-13 -- ADS-recognized three-
day Combined Driving Event
September 9-10 -- Driving Trials Back to
Back, two full one-day Driving Trials, one
on Saturday, another on Sunday
Mark your calendars, arrange your
farmsitter, and come and join us for
another amazing year of carriage driving
in the great Pacific Northwest. Come and
join the fun! Check the EI website for
upcoming details at einw.org
Many thanks to all for making our Year
End Driving Lunch such fun, and congrats
again to our year end award winners: nice
job! A quick shout out to our EI Driving
Committee, who work like sleep deprived
carpenter ants to make these events a
reality: Diana Axness, Ann Davis, Mary
Decher, Donna Fellows, Merridy Hance,
Peter Hance, Anna Johnson, Leslie
McGinnis, Carolyn Nelson, Lowell Nelson,
Pam Reese. And welcome to our newest
committee members: Mandy Hood, Mary
Welborn, Dorothy and Ron Whiteman.
Thank you all!
Sport Horse Breeding Report
By Chris Bredeson
In addition to the work we do in putting
on Dressage Sport Horse Breeding (DSHB)
shows, like the 2017 Northwest Sport Horse
Breeders Classic I and II (August 26/27), we
strive to provide educational opportunities
for breeders and owners of young horse
prospects. On that note, what types of
education would be of interest to you?
Examples of things we could plan include
clinics or seminars on a number of topics
including:
Showing in-hand
Halter breaking foals
Starting young horses
Marketing breeding stock and their
offspring
Vet care for the the foal’s first year
Stallion Management
Artificial insemination
Please Email me at Chris@einw.org if
you are interested in any of the educational
ideas mentioned above or if you have other
suggestions.
Join the EI Community
www.einw.org
Equestrians Institute (EI) is a not-for-profit organization supporting the interests of equestrians in the
Pacific Northwest. EI sponsors events and educational opportunities in Driving, Eventing, Dressage and
Sport Horse Breeding. EI’s membership calendar year is December 1st through November 30th each year
.
EI Member Benefits
Periodic E-Flashes (email updates) to stay up-to-date on all EI news and events
Subscription to
Flying Changes
Magazine (a $48 value)
Discount rate for EI sponsored clinics and seminars participants
and
auditors!
Discount rate for EI sponsored schooling shows and events
Eligibility for EI's members-only Year-End Awards & $500 Education Grants
Voting rights in EI governance issues
EI is a USDF Group Member Organization (GMO) and all members are automatically USDF
Group Members (GMs); includes e-TRAK benefits ($35 value)
For USDF Participating Membership members must apply directly to USDF
======================tear here & return =====================
NEW MEMBER
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Individual $55 Tell me about VOLUNTEER opportunities
Add’tl Family Member $20 Tell me about event SPONSORSHIPS & advertising
Lifetime $350
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Name ______________________________________ Farm/Business _________________________________
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City ______________________ State ____ Zip __ _________
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Email _____________________________________________________________
Signature __________________________________ _________ Date_________
Tell us your equestrian discipline interests!
Dressage
Dressage is my primary discipline
Eventing Eventing is my primary discipline
Driving Driving is my primary discipline
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Breeding is my primary discipline
Other _____________________________
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einw.org
Questions? Membership@einw.org
Membership Fee $ ___________
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Total Enclosed $ ___________
PLEASE ENCLOSE CHECK & MAIL TO
Equestrians Institute
P.O. Box 1437
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Equine Performance
Sports Medicine Institute
With board-certified specialists in sports
med/rehab, internal medicine & surgery
360.568.3111
pilchuckvet.com • Snohomish
84 www.orEgoNDrEssagE.com JaNuary 2017
Oregon Dressage Society is a USDF
Group Member; ODS members are
automatically USDF Group Members.
2017 Executive Committee
President: Gaye McCabe | (503) 378-0309 | j-g.
mccabe@juno.com
President Elect: Ed Miller | (541) 890-5085 |
eamgroup@aol.com
Secretary: Valerie Hallberg - Stallings | (541) 440-
9257 | valerie@barneystrophy.com
Treasurer: Dolores Morgan | (360) 703-7839 |
doloresmorgan@mindspring.com
Directors at Large:
Lisa Koch | (541) 410-5968 | lisakoch3@gmail.com
Jessica Rattner | (503) 830-9994 | jessica.rattner@
gmail.com
Anna Bigwood | (503) 591-3217 | abigwood@
comcast.net
Emily Kenyon | (541) 510-1761 | emii18@yahoo.
com
Gaye McCabe
Ed Miller
Regional Representatives
North Region (2): Kathy Casey | (971) 506-7786|
kathycaseydressage@gmail.com ; Tom Murray |
(626) 644-3008| tommurraydressage@gmail.com
Central Region: Karen Cheeke | (541) 740-8837
| kontessakeen@hotmail.com
South Region: Cassi Soule | (541) 817-7277
| weatheringsprings@yahoo.com
East Region: Sharm Daggett | (541) 426-3728 |
sharm@wallowacounty.com
Committee Chairs
Adult Committee: Francy Haupt | (971) 832-
2260 | dqhorsestuff@comcast.net
Awards Committee: Ed Miller | See President
Elect
Championship Show: Jennifer Milburn | (541)
231-7247| dressageshowmanager@gmail.com
Competitions Committee: Vacant
DSHB Committee: Diane Nauman | (541) 619-
7943 | nauman@yahoo.com
Finance Committee: Dolores Morgan (see
Treas)
Para Committee: Karina Molatore | (503) 523-
8084 | karina.molatore@gmail.com
Youth Committee: Gaye McCabe (see Pres)
Additional State Positions
Asst. Treasurer: Jorine Rietman | (503) 849-8235
| j.rietman@comcast.net
Awards/USEF Shows: Christopher Main | (503)
389-0191 | christopher@haywardfarm.com
Awards/ODS League Shows: Vacant
Awards/DSHB: Dolores Morgan (see Treas)
Awards/Special: Joyce Stride | (503) 647-0168
Editor/Policies & Procedures: Ed Miller (see
Awards)
ODS Librarian: Francy Haupt (see Adult Com
-
mittee)
4H Liaison: Joyce Stride | (503) 647-0168
Historian: Kim Hixson | (509) 698-6778
Chapter Ofcers: Listed on ODS Website
Central Ofce: Corinne Tindal Stonier Executive
Director | (503) 681-2337 | (503) 681-3873 fax |

Oregon
Dressage
Society
CLUB NEWS
www.oregondressage.com
e Volte
ODS President’s Note:
This month I would like to update
everyone up on the events from the USDF
Convention. This year Jessica Rattner,
Corinne Stonier and I represented ODS as
well as Region 6. The convention took place
in St. Louis. Thankfully the weather for the
most part cooperated though was on the cool
side. Thursday of convention is spent going
from meeting to meeting learning what the
committees have been up to and any potential
items to come to the floor of the Board of
Governors (BOG) for a vote. The BOG is
where the action takes place and where your
vote still counts. Highlights from this year:
Adult Programs Committee reported
on a proposal which was dependent on
the approval of in increase of dues for
Participating Members (PM). The proposal
known as the USDF National Education
Initiative is designed to meet the needs of a
broader base of USDF members. The history
of the USDF Adult Clinic was there used to
be one every year somewhere in the region.
Due to the challenge of finding one clinician
available to attend nine clinics in one year
as well as the cost the clinics then moved
to an every other year format with even
number regions one year and odd number
the next. The new proposal is to offer up to
$3,000.00/per region of grant money to be
divided in the region to enable GMO’s to
offer programs that can best meet the needs
of their membership. USDF will have a list of
approved clinicians, but will also review other
recommendations. Money many be used for
mounted/unmounted/adult camps and ride
and review type clinics. More information on
this program will be forth coming.
Awards Committee: Three motions
came to the board which all passed, the
motions were: 1) to increase the minimum
median required score from 60% to 63%
for the Musical Freestyle Year-End Award.
To become effective October 1, 2017. 2). To
increase the minimum median required score
from 60% to 63% for the Musical Challenge.
To be effective October 1, 2017. 3). Approved
the new Adult Amateur Musical Freestyle Award
with a required score of 63%. To be effective
October 1,2017.
Regional Championship Committee:
USDF Finals committee reported that there
were 1014 scheduled rides for this year’s
finals. They also provided the following
comparisons: 2016 there were 570 stalls
used representing 39 states and 210 adult
amateurs. In 2015 there were 500 stalls
used representing 36 states and 189 Adult
Amateurs. Each Region sent the following
number of riders: Region 1 – 59, Region 2 –
94, Region 3 – 72, Region 4 -41, Region 5 10,
Region 6 – 9, Region 7 – 15, Region 8 – 42
and Region 9 – 36.
A committee representing the West Coast
put forward DG Bar Ranch as a proposed
site for a Finals location. A site location
committee will visit the proposed site in the
fall of 2017 and report back to the BOG on
what they found.
We were reminded that you may check
your progress towards earning USDF medals
by going to USDFscores.com.
Did you know that there are perks to
being a USDF member other than the obvious
ones? Find out more at: www.usdf.org/join/
memberPerks/. One benefit I checked out
was for a discount on hotels. I found it easy
to navigate and a hotel discount of 10% at a
hotel I use for shows!
USDF Dues Increase: This month there
was a vote to increase dues for PM, Youth,
5 year, Life and Business Memberships.
The committee chose not to request any
dues increase for Group Members (GM)
members. The last dues increase was in
2011 membership year. The following dues
increases were voted on and passed. The dues
increase will be for the 2018 membership year
and will increase to the following amounts:
from $75.00 to $90.00 for Participating
Members (PM), $60.00 to $72.00 for Youth,
$300.00 to $360.00 for Five Year, $1500.00
to $1800.00 for Life and $200.00 to $240 for
Business memberships.
Until next month, Gaye McCabe
ODS President
JaNuary 2017 www.orEgoNDrEssagE.com 85
2016 Rider Awards Procedure
Please watch your ODS broadcast e-mails
for an announcement that will contain
instructions about procedures as well as a link
to the list of 2016 ODS Rider Awards winners
for both ODS League and ODS Licensed
awards plates. The date will be based upon
timing of receipt of results and reports from
show secretaries and from USDF but should
be sometime this month. League plates will
be sent automatically to riders who earn
them (paid by “participation fees”); due to
USEF rules, Licensed plates will need to be
ordered and paid for by riders. We are asking
for every rider to please review their horse’s
name for accuracy (spelling, missing parts,
etc.), and to audit the number of scores listed
against your actual tests. We will need to have
award corrections phoned or emailed to ODS
award coordinators by a deadline which will
be specified in the broadcast e-mail.
Attention High School Dressage Seniors!
Scholarship application deadline is April
1. If you are a graduating Senior, involved
in the High School Dressage program and
will be attending college next year, you may
apply for the ODS College Scholarship. The
application and guidelines are posted on the
ODS Website’s High School page. If you
need any assistance please feel free to contact
Gaye McCabe at J-G.McCabe@Juno.com or
call her at (503) 378-0309.
Annual Chapter Ocer and ODS Board
Retreat
To be held on January 28 and 29, 2017 at
the at the Silver Falls Conference Center,
Sublimity, OR. This event is open to ALL
ODS members and supporters. If you are a
new chapter ocer, this is where you receive
training about ODS operations, programs,
insurance and more. Plan on workshops,
brainstorming and other important items to
be on the agenda. This is a not to miss event
for Chapter Ocers and ODS Committee
chairs. If there is enough interest, there is a
possibility of hosting a treasurer’s workshop
on Saturday morning. Limited space; the
price has increased for this year due to the
costs rising (ODS tries to break even at this
event); you must pre-register so watch for
n e-mail to all chapter ocers or find the
link on ODS calendar to online registration.
Contact the ODS Secretary to get put onto
the agenda or the oce with questions (503)
681-2337 oce@oregondressage.com.
NW Horse Fair – Demo Riders and
Volunteers Needed
ODS is proud to announce that we will
again be involved in the dressage presentation
at the Northwest Horse Fair and Expo,
which is to be held March 24, 25 and 26 in
Albany, Oregon. Information on Demo Rider
applications has been posted to the News
page of the ODS website – Francy Haupt is
in charge of organizing Demo Riders. Demo
riders will be provided with admission tickets
(one for rider, one for groom) and stabling.
ODS will also have a booth in the trade
fair with ODS logo merchandise such as
t-shirts, vests and hats for sale and specially
ordered books and DVDs which will be sold
at a discount to our members. Volunteering
in the booth has been a lot of fun in the past
years and it is an unequaled opportunity to
share information about dressage. We need
a few volunteers to staff the booth each day.
We are offering a $10 admission pass in
exchange for a three to four hour shift in the
booth. Duties are fairly light - handing out
brochures, answering questions and selling
merchandise. We will provide on the job
training. Members interested in helping can
visit the ODS Volunteer webpage to sign up
or contact Corinne Stonier in the ODS Oce.
Historically Speaking
Joyce T. Stride
Our ODS annual awards evening was
held November 12, 2016 at Bella Via venue
in Sherwood. “Mistress of Ceremony” was
Special Awards Chair, Joyce Stride, assisted
by Emily Kenyon and numerous presentors.
Again, nominations were light, but our
recepients were all very worthy. Chehalem
Mountain Chapter graciously provided all
the complimentory finger food and Bella Via
provided libations. A small, but enthusiastic
crowd attended.
The evening began with Chapter
Newsletter Award, sponsored by Central
Oregon Chapter and presented by Joyce
Stride to Editor Vallerie Stallings of the
Umpqua Valley Dressage and Combinned
Training Chapter. “The Half Halt” is
delightful and full of information.-”Words
come directly from the horse’s mouth.”
The Sportsmanship Award, sponsored and
presented by Tory Kelly, went to Christina
Erickson of Lower Puget Sound Chapter.
She contiued as web master, was secretary
for numerous shows and continued to be
dedicated to the success of her chapter,
despite personal issues in her life.
Support Person Extraordinaire, sponsored
by Chehalem Mountain Chapter and
presented by Sarah Diebert went to Chris
Feves. She is supportive of her riders, works
well with others to bring in clincians and “the
86 www.orEgoNDrEssagE.com JaNuary 2017
horse” is most important. Chris carries on
despite health issues because “Horses leave
foot prints on your heart...
President’s Choice Horse Ambassador is
just that. Sponsored by Twin Rivers Chapter
and selected by Gaye McCabe, was “Pickle and
Spice”, owned and ridden by Phyllis Herinckx.
He is a gentle grand who began life with
major health issuesbut with Phyllis’care and
love he became a “Horse Master” and develops
skills and confidence in his many riders.
Another horse was added to our “Horse
Hall of Fame”: 28year old “Refire”, owned
and ridden by Christina Hanson of Gig
Harbor, Wa.
Volunteer of the Year, sponsored by Pacific
Crest Trail Chapter and presented by Marci
Sanders, went to Jamie Lewellyan, a Twin
Rivers member who “took the reins” and
revitalized the chapter which was on the
verge of disbanding. It is thriving and Jamie
gets more excerise “because riding is the
only sport where she can get excerise while
sitting down.”
Mary Ann Judkins Memorial Instructor’s
Award. sponsored by State of Jefferson
Chapter and presented by Andrea Quale,
went to Susan Davis Atkinson, a dedicated
and kind instructor. Her many students were
on hand for the event. She good at conveying
the most valuable lessonto her students:
i.e.”The art of keeping a horse between you
and the ground.”
Mid Valley Chapter sponsors the M. Teresa
Dunlap Spcial Recognition Award, presented
by Corrine Stonier and Rose Newman, went
to dedicated ODS member, Sarah Diebert
who works tireless behind the scenes these
past many years. She takes on many tasks
and does them well.She designed this year’s
program. She is appreciated by all of us and
we applaud her.”There is no greater joythan
a nice ride on a pony on a beautiful day.”
{Judy Richter-”Pony Talk.”]
The Nate Asby Award, established by
his family in 2015 in his memory, is to be
presented to an ODS member who by their
example of overcoming an obstacle in their
life such as a physical or mental disability
or other life changing event inspires others
with their determination. Karina Molatore
has done just that by returning to the saddle
after a serious accident resulting in the loss
of one arm. The well deserved award was
presented by Sarah Asby and Ahna Bowman,
Nate’s instructor of many years. “A man or
a woman on a horse is spiritually as well as
physically bigger than a man on foot.” John
Steinbeck.
“Many will walk in and out of your life
but only true friends will leave foot prints
on your heart. Eleanor Roosevelt. With that
said-enjoy your time with friends, family and
most of all, with your horse and we will see
you enter at A in 2017.
ACCEPTING NEW FARRIER CLIENTS
Over 10 years of experience including work with
Dr. Mark Revenaugh, DVM
Apprenticed with Joe McKee
Dedicated to ongoing education
References available
(503) 830-9580 • Wilsonville, Oregon
APRIL AD PLACED
OHJA Board Members
President
Beka Swan (503) 349-0314
Vice President
Simone Starnes (858) 243-4035
Treasurer
Joe Regan (503) 981 1978
Secretary
Katy George
Jumper Representative:
Brooke McLeod (541) 821-3444
Hunter Representative:
Dustin Goodwin
Equitation Representative:
Trish Helmer
Members at Large
Martha Brooks (541) 951-2589
Mollie Gallaway (541) 954-5432
Kathy Hall (971) 404-5296
Will Hawkins
Junior Reps
Grace Salmon
Kara Hix
Zoe Maskell
www.oregonhunterjumper.org
Oregon
Hunter/Jumper
Association
www.oregonhunterjumper.org
2017 Membership
Don’t forget to renew your membership and
update your horse membership before you show
in order for your points to count. Make sure
your information is correct including your age
for accurate point accumulation. Renew your
membership online by logging in on the OHJA
website. If you don’t want to deal with the hassle
of remembering to renew then there is a life
membership option. TRAINERS – make sure
you have also renewed in order for your clients’
points to count towards year-end awards.
Rule Changes
Check out the new rule changes after the
January 8th meeting on the OHJA website. Attend
the OHJA General Meeting at 10am on the 8th
at the Sentinel Hotel to take part in the voting
process and be involved with the organization.
There are some important changes proposed
that impact the local show system.
2017 Board
Meet your 2017 Board of Directors! After the
votes are in and positions decided the
board members will be available to
answer questions and their contact
information will be available on the
website as well under the OHJA Board
tab. If you want to get more involved,
you can get on a committee and make
a difference in the community. There
are multiple committees including
but not limited to Education, Show
Management, Scholarship and the
Junior Equestrian Fund. Sign up with the
Committee Interest Form or contacting
the appropriate representative.
Three Tier System Highlights
The system allows riders to compete
against others at their level for year-end
awards. Which system should you join?
If you show primarily in USEF rated
shows including outside of Oregon and
contiguous counties then the OPEN
system is best (local show points do
CLUB NEWS
not count towards awards).
If you show primarily in USEF rated shows within
Oregon then the REGIONAL system is best (the first
3 local OHJA shows count for points, but no show that
takes place outside of Oregon or its contiguous counties
will garner points for year-end awards).
If you show primarily in non-rated local shows within
Oregon and the contiguous counties then join the LOCAL
system (the first 3 USEF rated shows will count towards
the local system).
Horses and riders are welcome to compete in all shows,
just make sure you understand that points may not count
depending on what system you join. NOTE if you do not
live in Oregon or a contiguous county then you are only
eligible to join the OPEN system and must attend 3 or
more Oregon shows to accumulate points.
Changing your system: After you join or renew your
membership you may choose a higher system but may
not move down to a lower one. There will be a fee and
form required to make the change. If you are not sure
about your show plans you may want to start in a lower
system level but note that your points will not transfer.
For example, if you are currently in the Local system
you may choose to move into Regional or Open. If you
are in Regional then you may move up to the Open
system but you are not allowed to move out of the Open
system. Discuss what system is best for you and your
horse(s) with your trainer when renewing your OHJA
membership. You can also consult the OHJA rule book
for further information.
Sponsorship
Want more advertising for your business? Want a tax
deduction? en donate to the OHJA. No donation or
gift is too small and each gift makes a dierence. OHJA
is an IRS 501(c)(3) non-prot charitable organization and
donations are tax deductible. You can sponsor the OHJA
Medal Finals and/or the Year End Awards Banquet and/or
the OHJA Scholarship or Junior Equestrian Fund. Contact
a board member or consult the website in order to donate.
88
www.oregon.ponyclub.org
JaNuary 2017
Pony Club is planning a fun-lled and
education year of activities!
United States Pony Clubs has three
tiers: local, regional, and national. Each
local club will regularly host unmounted
meetings throughout the year, which are
educational activities on a wide range of
horse-related topics. These may include
guest speakers such as veterinarians,
saddle tters, equine dentists, and
trainers. Unmounted meetings also
involve hands-on practice in such skills
as tack care, bandaging, rst aid and
wound care, trailering, and ground work.
Each club also hosts riding lessons,
tailored to each Pony Club member’s
individual level and goals, and taught
by experienced instructors.
The Oregon Region is holding shows
throughout the year in Dressage,
Eventing, Show Jumping, Tetrathlon,
and Quiz. We are hosting instructional
seminars with top clinicians, including
riding clinics, safety and emergency
training, understanding the Pony Club
standards, horse management skills,
and effective coaching. The region is
planning a fabulous and popular summer
camp for all ages and levels, which is
already a favorite annual event and
promises to be even better this year.
On a national level, we are sending
participants to Los Angeles for the
United States Pony Club Convention
and Equine Symposium. This ve day
extravaganza includes training for club
leaders, and dozens of clinics and
seminars on a wide range of terric topics
for youth members, adult members,
and Pony Club parents and volunteers.
Oregon is pleased to be sending a large
group to Convention.
We are also looking forward to the
USPC Festival in Lexington, Kentucky.
This week-long event at the Kentucky
Horse Park includes more than 3,000
Pony Club participants, and includes
National Championships competition in
seven disciplines, followed by numerous
mounted and unmounted educational
clinics. Pony Club members are already
working hard to qualify to travel to
Kentucky for this great event.
You do not need your own horse to
join Pony Club. Opportunities abound
for those with limited access to a horse
or pony. All unmounted education,
Quiz rally, camp, clinics, stable manager
positions, and seminars are open to
youth and adult members, regardless
of riding ability or horse availability.
For experienced and seasoned riders,
Pony Club offers advanced mounted
and unmounted education, including
opportunities for high level competition.
For more information, visit us at Oregon.
ponyclub.org.
www.oregon.ponyclub.org
For all inquiries, please contact
oregonregionboard@gmail.com
Oregon Region Clubs
Canterwood
Camas/SW Washington
Columbia Winds
Portland/Hillsboro/St. Helens
Fox Hills
Ridgefield/SW Washington
High Lakes
Central Oregon/Bend
Highland Riders
Beavercreek
Iron Horse
Portland/Beaverton/Sherwood
Jumps & Jodhpurs
Eugene/Corvallis
Mount Hood
Hood River/Columbia Gorge
Oregon Trail
Lake Oswego/West Linn
Patton Valley
Forest Grove/Hillsboro
Rose City
Portland/Beaverton/Sherwood
Willamette Valley
Salem
Willowbrook
Clark County, WA
CLUB NEWS
Oregon Region
of the United
States Pony
Clubs
www.oregon.ponyclub.org
JaNuary 2017
www.WSHJA.org
89
Washington
State Hunter
Jumper
Association
www.WSHJA.org
WSHJA is a non-profit,
member-run association
reliant on generous sponsors,
charitable volunteers, and
avid participation of the
hunter/jumper community
to accomplish its mission—
championing the
achievements of and serving
the interests of both its riders
and horses—to ensure a
thriving equestrian culture in
the Pacic Northwest.
www.WSHJA.org
WSHJA 2016
Board of Directors
CLUB NEWS
Contact info available on wshja.org
2017 WSHJA BOARD
President: Shelly Kerron
Vice President: Quinn Partridge
Treasurer: Nancy Lewis
Secretary:
Hunter Rep: Nora Thomas
Equitation Rep: Heather MacDonald
Amateur Rep: Peter Brandon
Pony Rep: Jamie Smith
Jumper Rep: Katherine Wade-Easley
Junior Reps: Olivia Brandon
Members at Large:
Tory Bova
Lizzie Kerron
Bo Masters
Sara Peterson
Clare Warren
DID YOU KNOW?
WSHJA was founded in 1952 and is a non-

the hunter jumper sport in the state of
Washington.
WSHJA presents 5 USEF-sanctioned horse
shows each year including the Evergreen
Classic.
WSHJA offers educational scholarships as
well as scholarships to members that attend
    
be eligible for funding, volunteer hours for
WSHJA during the show season are required.
See By-Laws for details.
WSHJA has two yearend awards programs.
The State Program is for members who
primarily show in the state of Washington.
The National Program is for members who
compete at horse shows outside the state
as well as in Washington.
JOIN NOW FOR 2017
Join or renew on line today at www.wshja.
org. Be sure to record your horse(s) at the
same time. Adding horses at a later date
can only be done by downloading the
membership form and mailing or emailing.
2017 WSHJA HORSE SHOW DATES:
April 5 – 9
Spring National Inaugural Hunter
& Jumper Show
April 11 – 16
Spring National Hunter Show (WCHR) –
August 9 - 13
Evergreen Classic
September 13 - 17
NW Autumn Classic (WCHR)
October 11 - 15
October Classic
NEW BOARD FOR 2017:
President: Shelly Kerron
Vice President: Quinn Partridge
Treasurer: Nancy Lewis
Hunter Rep: Nora Thomas
Equitation Rep: Heather MacDonald
Amateur Rep: Peter Brandon
Pony Rep: Jamie Smith
Jumper Rep: Katherine Wade-Easley
Junior Rep: Olivia Brandon
Members at Large:
Tory Bova
Lizzie Kerron
Bo Masters
Sara Peterson
Clare Warren
Pacic Carriage - Marathon Driving Cart - Horse Size
In excellent condition. Comes with cover and new driving
whip. Asking $7,500. Also a Camptown driving harness -
synthetic - horse size in excellent condition. Asking $800
Call or text to 1 360 914 7224
Photograph is carriage likeness.
Actual Carriage is the same
with black with maroon
accent panels.
FOR SALE
Masters of Fox Hounds
Melody Fleckenstein, MFH
Michael Wager, Sr. Jt.MFH
Tami Masters, Jt. MFH
RJ Argenzio-West, Sr. Ad. MFH
Joanna Herrigstad, Sr. Ad. MFH
Jean Brooks, MFH Emeritus
Hunt Sta
Jennifer Hansen, Huntsman
Sarah Glaser, Kennelman, Whip
Michael Wager, Whip
Emily Rang, Whip
Cathy Elledge, Whip
Margo Forstrom, Whip
Tami Masters, Fox Club, Whip
Eric Stiemert, Fox Club
Simon Chapman, Fox Club
Patty Stiemert, Field Master
Tabitha Handly, Field Master
Debbie Flynn, Field Master
Melody Fleckenstein, Field Master
Board of Directors
Debbie Flynn, President
Sharon Scott, Vice President
Andrea Lorig, Secretary
Deborah Giddings, Treasurer
Emily Rang, Ex Ef
Karl Klein, Trustee
Michelle Hoedeman, Trustee
Cathy Elledge, Trustee
Missy McGan, Trustee
Earl McNally, Trustee
Patty Steimert, Trustee
Woodbrook
Hunt Club
Lakewood, WA
www.woodbrookhuntclub.com
Save the Date – Our 90th Anniversary Hunt Ball!
To celebrate WHCs 90th anniversary (we
were incorporated in 1926), the Annual Hunt
Ball and Auction will have a Roaring 20’s dress
theme on March 18, 2017 at the Tacoma Golf
and Country Club. This coincides with Joint-
Base Lewis-McChord’s 100th anniversary; we
have been hunting on the military reservation
for 90 years! Interesting fact, the club was
originally located on the land where the
McChord runway is located, so the DOD
moved us to our current site so the runway
could be built.
Invitations will go out the first of February.
If you are not a current member and would
like an invitation for you and your friends,
trainer or barn, contact Debbie Flynn at
daynn459@hotmail.com. Its a night of
dinner, dancing, horn blowing and whip
cracking and an awesome silent auction with
a few great live auction items, something for
all the equestrians! Donations to the silent or
live auction are very much appreciated!
Huntsman Jenn Hansen’s Report
Our kennel is full of activity and hounds
are going out on mounted exercises three days
each week. The “I” puppy litter all know their
names and they are walking out with us and
learning to respond to the horn.
We also have three new drafts to introduce:
Delilah ’15, Delaware ’15, and Guardian who
is unentered. These drafts are from the Mill
Creek Hunt Club just north of Chicago. This
is the same pack we drafted Ketchup and
Gearhead from in 2014 and you’ll notice a
strong resemblance as Delaware and Delilah
are by one of Ketchup’s littermates.
Sunday December 4th marked a special hunt
for me. What was supposed to be a dark, wet,
and stormy day, turned out mostly sunny and
just light winds. We left the kennels promptly
at 11am and hacked across 7N. I drew a narrow
cover on the north corner of 7S and after a
short look hounds found and gave beautiful
cry on a great line laid by our foxes.
Our field doubled in size at Hillhurst when
we met up with members who had not gotten
the morning’s notice of our fixture change.
We moved off from Hillhurst just before noon
and hunted our longest dragline yet! The
conditions allowed us to give runners a healthy
head start and the views were incredible,
offering staff and field the chance to watch
hounds recast and find the scent numerous
times, as well as view deer, coyote and bears.
We have a crafty fox club!
The line inally drew to an end when
hounds caught up to Simon Chapman and
Papa fox (Eric Stiemert) at the Chimney near
the southern tip of TA9. One of drag hunting’s
many challenges is mimicking game and
keeping hounds’ interest and enthusiasm for
long runs. Our human foxes do their very best
but still have to contend with the weather
and tricky terrain. Each day is different and
the reward of happy hounds, tired horses,
and a field full of smiles and great stories is
absolutely priceless.
Social Report – Oh What Fun….
Thank you Missy McGan for organizing
dinner and dancing at the Roy Steakhouse and
Saloon on December 2nd. It was a wonderful
evening full of laughter and good fun!
December 10th marked the 3rd annual
Woodbrook Neighborhood Progressive Party.
The festivities started at Kim and Steve Pratt’s
Klearmont Farm complete with food, drink,
and beer pong in the barn aisle. Second up,
MFH Melody Fleckenstein’s Hunt Box Farm
with her daughter Jacqueline helping to host
the classiest of stops. The Fleckensteins’
Huntbox feels like you’re in the heart of
Middleburg VA… oh wait, we’re in Lakewood?
Yes!
Next we walked across the driveway to
Starre @ Horseland Farms hosted by Jt.
MFH Tami Masters and huntsman Jenn
Hansen with help from the Parks family. It’s
always amazing just how many people can fit
in to the Masters’ kitchen! Queso, hot spiced
cider, and Christmas jello shots on the menu
here. Then a wet walk over to the Woodbrook
Hunt Club hosted by Sr. Jt. Mike Wager and
club president Debby Flynn. If you have not
visited the WHC clubhouse, you really should.
It boasts years of history and is as darling as
can be, decorated up for the holidays, thanks
to Scott Goodrich, and recent decorating
CLUB NEWS
Contact Information
Our website
www.woodbrookhuntclub.com
is your greatest resource to learn more
about drag fox hunting with us, our
hounds, activities, and club history.
Like us on Facebook!
Questions and information requests are
best directed to:
Melody Fleckenstein, MFH
(425) 417-4003
woodbrookhuntclub@gmail.com
Jennifer Hansen, Huntsman
(253) 377-4892
huntsmanhansen@gmail.com
Michelle Hoedeman , Membership
(253) -273-6414
michelle2teach@hotmail.com
90 www.wooDbrookHuNtclub.com JaNuary 2017
improvements and donations from Monica
Maul. Neighbors and friends all received a
gift card good for one complimentary capping
fee with the hunt good for a year, and if you
are already a member you can share it with a
friend. If you did not receive one at the party,
email woodbrookhuntclub@gmail.com and
we’ll send you one.
Finally, we progressed to Woodbrook
Stables hosted by Kerry Flaherty and Jen
Getty for delicious sliders and mashed potato
bar (thanks to the Sr. Getty’s), and dancing
in the barn aisle with the horses enjoying
the festivities from their stalls flanking the
aisleway. The perfect way to draw a fun filled
evening to a close!
Christmas Caroling in the Hood
The next morning a group of riders from
several of the barns decorated their horses,
donned costumes and went Christmas caroling
in the American Lake Gardens neighborhood!
We handed out little gift bags of candy and
other goodies to the kids and Subway gift
certificates to the adults. Thanks again to Kerry
Flaherty for keeping these traditions going!
Membership
Half-year memberships become available
January 1st. If you have been considering
becoming a member, this is the time! Turn in
your membership application with initiation
fee and ½ year dues before the board meeting
Tami Masters on
Western Flyer and
Kerry Flaherty on
Dante ready for
Woodbrook
Caroling
on January 12th and enjoy hunting and a host
of other activities from now until Opening
Day 2017 next October!
That means a membership for a single is
$325.00; a family is $425.00; junior is $75.00
and social is $125.00. Military memberships
are $275.00 for a family and $225. for a single
after Jan. 1. And aliate membership for
riders stabled in the Woodbrook neighborhood
are $50.
Visit www.woodbrookhuntclub.com or
contact membership chair Michelle Hoedeman
(michelle2teach@hotmail.com) if you have
questions.
Blessing of the Hounds
The Blessing of the Hounds Hunt is perhaps
our most special hunt of the year, the custom of
blessing the hunt has survived since medieval
times. St. Hubert medals are blessed and
handed out, St. Hubert (died 727 AD) was a
spoiled son of the Duke of Aquitaine in France,
who went off hunting on Good Friday instead of
going to church. As he was pursuing a stag, the
animal turned and between its antlers he saw
a crucix. He heard a voice saying, “Unless you
turn to the Lord and lead a holy life, you will
quickly go down into hell.” Hubert renounced
his former life and became a priest, later the
first Bishop of Liege in Belgium, and is known
as the patron saint of the chase.
Thanks to Rev. Elizabeth Klein, this is
Blessing of the
Hounds Hunt
Breakfast
We had a lot of
gray horses in the
First Flight for the
Blessing of the
Hounds
WHC member Jessica
Reaves and Kingsley
ready for Caroling
always a very special day for us and this year
was no exception. We woke up to frigid temps
and a layer of thick ice on the parking areas and
driveways. Mother Nature seems to lead us in
her own ways, and due to the ice the service
was held under a large evergreen tree, protected
enough that the green grass at its trunk was not
frozen. The hounds waited quietly at the kennel
for most of the sermon, and when invited they
were very social and enjoyed mingling with
patrons mounted and on foot.
After a terrific hunt, we returned to the
clubhouse, and we owe a hearty thank you to
the Woodbrook Hunt Pony Club for cooking
up an outstanding hunt breakfast that warmed
us all up after a chilly ride, it’s always a treat
for members and guest!
Woodbrook Hunt Club Activities:
At print time we were still awaiting approval
from JBLM for January Permits.
Hounds go out Tuesdays, Fridays, and
Saturday or Sunday. Fixtures vary depending
on areas that are open for recreation and
permits we are granted.
Please check our website for the most up do
date fixture information. We will also post the
January fixtures on our Facebook page.
Contact Jennifer Hansen to confirm time
and location huntsmanhansen@gmail.com
or (253) 377-4892.
JaNuary 2017 www. wooDbrookHuNtclub.com 91
Area VII
Regional Representatives
Area Chair
John Meriwether 425-785-2001
jmeriwet@comcast.net
Treasurer
Lorilee Hanson 425-213-6287
20317 SE 119th Ct, Issaquah, WA 98027
lorileehanson@gmail. com
Young Rider Coordinator
Malcolm Hook 503-678-1016
msghook@centurylink.net
Young Rider Rep
Kristin Holderman
kristinh9@gmail.com
Adult Rider Coordinator
Maggie Rikard 360-825-4758
magsnags@aol.com
Board of Governors Area Representatives
Mark Hart 503-452-1975
mark2992@aol.com
Sarah Broussard 406-756-8410
sbrouss103@aol.com
Louise Leslie 425-836-5616
louleslie@msn. com
Rider Representatives
Adult Amateur – Catie Cejka
Young Rider – awaiting nomination
Rider Representatives
Jonathan Elliott 360-485-2043
jonathan_elliott@hotmail.com
Area Secretary
Louise Leslie 425-836-5616
louleslie@msn.com
Website Organizer
Nancy Roddriguez 425-417-2071
nancyro1313@gmail.com
Area VII Council Members
Melissa Beardsley ..............206-499-5592
Jordan Lindstedt .............206-920-0930
Diane Snow
John Camlin
Brenda Mitleider
Kevin Baumgardner
United States
Eventing Association
Area VII
www.areavii.org
Area Report
Annual Meeting and Awards Banquet. is
year it will be held at the Portland Downtown
Waterfront Marriott January 28th, 2017. We
have a full day of meetings, discussions, and
workshops, with a pre-banquet reception
hosted by Adult Riders and Young Riders
while the Silent Auction gets underway. e
Silent Auction will continue throughout the
evening. Our guests include Area VII 4****
Rider Maya Black and USEA President-Elect
Carol Kozlowski - Eventing Great and Partner
of Erin Go Bragh.
Rachel McCart is coordinating our Silent
Auction again this year. We rely on the Silent
Auction Fundraiser to help pay for the ribbons,
the awards and the meeting. We count on your
generosity to make this meeting a success. If
you would like to donate to the Silent Auction,
contact rachel@equinelegalsolutions.com.
To book a reservation at the Portland
Marriott Downtown Waterfront Hotel, you can
use https://aws.passkey.com/go/USEA2017.
ose who pre-Registrations for the full
all-day meeting and awards banquet will be
eligible for door prizes including one of ten
$25 certicates for the Silent Auction.
We will have a new on-line registration form
which we encourage you to use. ere is still
the snail mail option, which will arrive in your
e-mail in box shortly
Adult Rider Report
As this is the time that most of us are
renewing/joining organizations and clubs, I
thought it would be a good time to recap some
of the reasons you should shell out $25 to join
Adult Riders.
Amazing prizes through out the year
More prizes at the end of the year
Discounts for AR camp and clinics which
you get priority notice.
Free auditing of clinics
Rebate for attending an USEA insured
educational activity
Eligibility for compensation to attend Team
Challenges (ATC or represent Area VII in
other areas)
Eligible for great fun and prizes in the Area
VII Team Championships (Inavale June 17)
Entry in drawings
Various awards for volunteering,
Camaraderie. Parties and more
A reminder that you can join two ways, with
your USEA membership or be contacting me
for a form You do NOT need to be a USEA
member to join Adult Riders.
e calendar will be printed and distributed
in January. Watch for emails and FB notices
when they arrive at tack stores. Pick up points
are Gallops in Tiggard OR, Olsons in Redmond
and e Gift Horse in Woodinville WA. e
Grange in Issaquah and Country Farm in Feed
in Enumclaw, WA. We will also have them
available at the annual meeting and I will mail
out for the cost of postage.
We are excited to oer two fantastic clinics to
get you prepped for the season. First weekend in
Feb brings the return of the amazing Leslie Law
and in April we will have the legendary Lucinda
Green back again. Both clinics are at the lovely
Aspen Farms in Yelm. Contact me for openings.
Auditing is free to paid AR members. Also in
April will be the much enjoyed Adult Rider
Camp. Returning to the fabulous Spokane
Sport Horse Farm it promises to be another
great fun and educational activity.
Maggie Rikard at magsnags@aol.com
Young Rider Report
As 2017 begins the Area VII Young Riders
would like to thank their many sponsors and
supporters throughout this past season. As a
newly rejuvenated program we accomplished
much this year. A spring clinic was a rousing
success and kicked o our competition season,
a small delegate to the North American
Junior Young Rider Championships was led
by Taryn McKee in a mentor participant role,
another successful YR Benet Horse Trial
(which is our primary and sole fundraiser),
Young Rider Advancement Summer Camp,
several Young Rider Social and Low Score
Award Shows and the inaugural Young
Rider Team Challenge at Caber Farm for
all levels and ages of riders were all deemed
fun, educational and success.
e YRs plan on hosting the YR Team
Challenge again next year and encourage
more competitors to take part in it—its a
great learning experience and way to be a
part of a true team atmosphere. e purpose
of putting on the YR Team Challenge is to
CLUB NEWS
provide all members the opportunity to be a part
of team atmosphere and prepare them for North
America Junior Young Rider Championships.
Our goal will be to send a full one star ( Juniors
18 and under) and two star team (Young Riders
under 21)to NAJYRC in 2017.
We could not thank our supporters and board
members enough for their generosity of funds,
time and enthusiasm and we look forward to
what the 2017 season has to oer.
Have a great Ride!
Karla Nichwander
USEA Area VII Young Rider Coordinator
krnichwander@gmail.com
Kristen Holderman
USEA Area VII YR Rep
Kristenh9@gmail.com
92 www. arEaVII.org JaNuary 2017
F E B R U A R Y 2 2 - 2 6
S A N T A B A R B A R A , C A
S a n t a B a r b a r a
Surfside Classic
M A R C H 1 - 5
S A N T A B A R B A R A , C A
S a n t a B a r b a r a
Sunshine Classic
M A R C H 8 - 1 2
P A S O R O B L E S , C A
C e n t r a l C a l i f o r n i a
Welcome Classic
M A R C H 1 5 - 1 9
P A S O R O B L E S , C A
C e n t r a l C a l i f o r n i a
Zinfandel Classic
W W W . W E S T P A L M S E V E N T S . C O M
2017
P H O T O : M E D I A 2 7
2017 Event Dates
Page 94
January 2016
January 2017
8 Freedom Run Hunter/Jumper Show. Reber
Ranch in Auburn, WA. Show Manager: Lea
Wilson . Contact: chalicefarms@gmail.com
12 ODS Leaders Retreat Registration Dead-
line; see event on January 28 & 29.
21 Hilander PC Hunter/Jumper/Combined
Test Cowlitz County Expo, Longview, WA.
Contact dglongacre@aol.com
25 PNW Focus on Feed, Forage and Trace
Mineral Nutrition. 11:30-4:00pm, Tualatin
Heritage Center, Oregon. Co-Hosted by
CHS Nutrition and Oregon Horse Country
“You’ll never get this many equine nutri-
tion PhDs in one room again!” Are you
responsible for the diet of 2 or more horses
in your care? Are you often giving advice
or information to horse owners about
their animals diet? If so, this workshop
is for you! Natalie Shaw, BS, PAS Equine
Nutrition Specialist for CHS Equis Feed
Representative. 406-599-7694 Natalie.
shaw@chsinc.com
28-29 ODS Leaders Retreat at the Silver Falls
Conference Center, Sublimity, OR. This
event is open to ALL ODS members and
supporters. Register online; link on the
ODS website calendar or contact (503)
681-2337.
31 Nomination Deadline for the Oregon
Dressage Society Futurity Program, held
at the ODS Championship Show. Form and
nomination fee due by this date; futurity
fee due later in the summer. Visit the ODS
website calendar for details or contact
(503) 681-2337.
February 2017
4-5 Mountain Trail Schooling Show Series 2.
Oregon Horse Center, Eugene, OR. Con-
tact: Kimberly Moser; kim@oregonhorse-
center.com or call 541-689-9700.
11-12 USDF ‘L’ Education Program Session A - In-
troductions to Judging and Biomechanics
with Jayne Ayers in Wilsonville, OR. www.
oregondressage.com Francy Haupt 971-
832-2260 dqhorsestu@gmail.com
21 Hilander Pony Club Hunter Jumper show
and Combined Test Series, Longview, WA
at the Cowlitz County Fairgrounds. www.
facebook.com/HilanderPonyClub/ or call
Veronica (360) 749-9520.
25-26 Bears Above the Ground - ODS League
Dressage Show – at the Yamhill Cty Fair-
grounds, McMinnville, OR – MaryAnn (503)
307-5382.
March 2017
4-5 Mountain Trail Schooling Show Series 3.
Oregon Horse Center, Eugene, OR. Con-
tact: Kimberly Moser; kim@oregonhorse-
center.com or call 541-689-9700.
11-12 Bridge City Spring Classic. Dressage;
DevonWood, Sherwood, OR. Contact:
Evin Rattner, (503) 974-1667, dwspring@
devonwoodec.com
CALENDAR
12 Daylight Savings/Spring Forward HJ
Schooling Show, Lake Oswego Hunt-
Contact: Janice Weis: weisjl@msn.com
or 503-961-2103. www.lakeoswegohunt.
com for entry form.
18-19 USDF ‘L’ Education Program Session
B - Judging Criteria for Gaits & Paces,
Movements & Figures with Trenna Atkins
in Wilsonville, OR. www.oregondressage.
com Francy Haupt 971-832-2260 dqhors-
estu@gmail.com
23-26 Rally In the Valley Part 1. Dressage; Oregon
Horse Center , Eugene OR. Contact: Heath-
er Engstrom, (541) 689-9700, heather@
oregonhorsecenter.com. www.oregon-
horsecenter.com
30-2 Spring Hunter Jumper Show, Clark County
Fairgrounds. - Contact: Mollie Gallaway
Main - 541-342-5432/Fax 541-685-9088;
Mollie - 541-914-0052 ; triplerise@earth-
link.net, www.triplerisehorseshows.com
31-1 Spring Into Dressage; Canby, OR. Contact:
Kaye Phaneuf, (503) 651-3037, phaneuf@
canby.com, www.oregondressage.com
April 2017
1 Oregon Dressage Society High School
Program’s College Scholarship Applica-
tion Deadline; more details on the ODS
website or Gaye McCabe (503) 378-0309.
1-2 Mountain Trail Schooling Show Series
4. Oregon Horse Center, Eugene, OR.
Contact: Kimberly Moser; kim@oregon-
horsecenter.com or call 541-689-9700.
5-9 Spring National Inaugrual, Monroe, WA.
Contact: Barbara Baierle; (360) 805-6711,
dianjnsn@aol.com, www.wshja.com
8 -9 Anne Gribbons Clinic, Equestrians Institute
Dressage Clinic Series Part I. Contact Gunn
Cooper, EI Dressage Director. 206-890-
3198 or dressage@einw.org. Location TBD
11-16 Spring National Hunter, Monroe, WA.
Contact: Barbara Baierle; (360) 805-6711,
dianjnsn@aol.com, www.wshja.com
15-16 DevonWood in the Spring. Dressage;
DevonWood, Sherwood, OR. Contact:
Evin Rattner, (888) 329-3932 , oce@
devonwoodec.com
19-23 Spring National Jumper, Monroe, WA.
Contact: Barbara Baierle; (360) 805-6711,
dianjnsn@aol.com, www.wshja.com
21-23 Karen O’Neal Eventing Clinic at Wash-
ington State Horse Park. Contact Natalie:
406-599-7694/Natmc12@gmail.com
21-23 AHBAO Spring Classic, Arabian Horse
Breeders Assc. OR. Oregon Horse Center
, Eugene OR. Contact: Heather Engstrom,
(541) 689-9700, heather@oregonhorse-
center.com. www.oregonhorsecenter.
com
28-30 AIM at the Hood Arabian Sports Horse
Show, West Linn, OR. Contact: Johanthan
Howell; (503) 819-8765, hoodshowman-
ager@gmail.com, www.arabiansinmo-
tion.org
OF EVENTS 2016 / 2017
Also @ FlyingChanges.com
May 2017
6 -7 Whidbey Equestrian Center Spring Dres-
sage, Coupeville, WA. Contact: Marinea
St.Amand, (360) 678-8860, mari@ridewec.
com
6 -7 Lower Puget Sounds Dressage Club Show.
Venue: Kitsap Saddle Club, Port Orchard,
WA. Website at www.lpsdc.com. Shows
can be entered online within 30 days of
the show.
6 -7 USDF ‘L’ Education Program Session
C - Collective Marks, Equitation, Rider
Bio-Mechanics and Basics with Joan
Darnell in Wilsonville, OR. www.oregon-
dressage.com Francy Haupt 971-832-2260
dqhorsestu@gmail.com
6 Quarry Ridge Friendship Series Hunt-
er-Jumper Show. Contact: Julia Rich-
ard www.quarryridgefarm.com or
juliacookrichard@gmail.com or 360-909-
8605
10 -14 Mothers Day Classic- Contact: Mollie Gal-
laway Main - 541-342-5432/Fax 541-685-
9088; Mollie - 541-914-0052 ; triplerise@
earthlink.net, www.teamnw.com
11-14 Spokane Sport Horse Farm 2nd Annual
Spring H.T. Open Date: Mar 28 | Close Date:
Apr 25. www.spokanesporthorse.com
12 -14 Spokane Sport Horse Spring Horse Trials,
Spokane, WA. Contact: Christel Carlson,
(509) 993-6786, ccarlson@spokanesport-
horse.com, www.spokanesprthorse.com
13 Donida Farm Spring Fling #1, Auburn, WA.
Contact : Gwen Blake, (360) 507-9306,
go410s@aol.com
13 Heart of the Valley Dressage, Sherwood,
OR, Secretary: Siobhan Barker Manager:
Jennifer Milburn, (541) 231-7247, jennifer.
milburn@oregonstate.edu
14 Heart of the Valley Dressage II, Sherwood,
OR, Secretary: Siobhan Barker Manager:
Jennifer Milburn, (541) 231-7247, jennifer.
milburn@oregonstate.edu
17-21 Pacic Nor thwest Hunter/Jumper Monroe,
WA. Contact: Barbara Baierle; (360) 805-
6711, dianjnsn@aol.com, www.wshja.com
19-20 Meadow Wood Dressage Opener, Bonnie
Hammond, (425) 330-2950, meadowwoo-
dec@gmail.com, www.meadowwoodec.
com
21 L'Aperitif, Dressage, Kirkland, WA. Contact:
Kaye Phaneuf, (425) 248-0936, dressage@
einw.org, www.einw.org
24 -28 Rose City Opener, Bend, OR. Hunter/Jump-
er. Contact: , 541-312-2425, alliedshows@
gmail.com www.alliedhorseshows.com
26 -28 Equestrians Institute Horse Trials, Cle Elum,
WA. Contact: Meika Decker, (910) 639-2695,
meika@polestarfarm.com
26 -28 22nd Annual Spokane Sport Horse Spring
Dressage Show, Spokane, WA. Contact:
Christel Carlson, (509) 993-6786, ccarlson@
spokanesporthorse.com, www.spokane-
sprthorse.com
2017 Event Dates
Page 95
January 2016
June 2017
2-4 Mountain Trail Schooling Show Series
Final. Oregon Horse Center, Eugene, OR.
Contact: Kimberly Moser; kim@oregon-
horsecenter.com or call 541-689-9700.
3 Quarry Ridge Friendship Series Hunt-
er-Jumper Show. Contact: Julia Rich-
ard www.quarryridgefarm.com or
juliacookrichard@gmail.com or 360-909-
8605
3 -4 Summervale Spring Dressage Festival, Roy,
WA. Contact: Paula Helm, (425) 457-1105,
paula.helm@gmail.com, www. summer-
valepremierdressage.com
3-4 Meadow Wood Two Rivers Dressage,
Bonnie Hammond, (425) 330-2950, mead-
owwoodec@gmail.com, www.meadow-
woodec.com
9-11 Aspen Farms H.T. Open Date: Apr 25 | Close
Date: May 23. www.aspenfarmseventing.
com
10 Central Oregon Dressage Classic I, Bend,
OR. Contact: Laura Swenson, (541) 390-
7015, jackswen21@gmail.com, centralore-
gondressage.com
10 -11 Whidbey Equestrian Center "Benet" Dres-
sage, Coupeville, WA. Contact: Marinea
St.Amand, (360) 678-8860, mari@ridewec.
com
10 -11 Lower Puget Sounds Dressage Club Show.
Venue: Sawda Equestrian Center, Port
Orchard, WA. Website at www.lpsdc.com.
Shows can be entered online within 30
days of the show.
11 Central Oregon Dressage Classic II, Bend,
OR. Contact: Laura Swenson, (541) 390-
7015, jackswen21@gmail.com, centralore-
gondressage.com
14-18 Oregon Trail - Contact: Mollie Gallaway
Main - 541-342-5432/Fax 541-685-9088;
Mollie - 541-914-0052 ; triplerise@earth-
link.net, www.teamnw.com
14-18 Swiftwater Invitational, Washington
State Horse Park, Cle Elum, WA. Contact:
Barbara Baierle, (253) 350-6579, nancy@
cascadehorseshows.com, www.cascade-
horseshows.com
16-18 Aspen Farms Horse Trials, Yelm, WA.
Contact: Jonathan Elliott, (360) 485-2043
, jonathan_elliott@hotmail.com, www.
aspenfarmseventing.com
17-18 Beaujolais Group, Chablis and Beaujolais.
Presented by Equestrians Institute at
Donida Farm Equestrian Center, Auburn,
WA. Contact Markay Kerr 253-381-7349,
markaymgr71@gmail.com or see Eques-
trians Institute at einw.org/pageDressage.
19-21 Lilo Fore Clinic, Equestrians Institute
Dressage Clinic Series Part II. Contact
Gunn Cooper, EI Dressage Director. 206-
890-3198 or dressage@einw.org. Location
TBD.
17 Annual Spokane Sport Horse Fathers Day
Dessage Classic, Spokane, WA. Contact:
Christel Carlson, (509) 993-6786, ccarlson@
spokanesporthorse.com, www.spokane-
sprthorse.com
21-25 Early Summer Classic - Contact: Mollie
Gallaway Main - 541-342-5432/Fax 541-
685-9088; Mollie - 541-914-0052 ; tripler-
ise@earthlink.net, www.teamnw.com
21-25 Alpine Preview, ,Washington State Horse
Park, Cle Elum, WA. Contact: Barbara Baier-
le, (253) 350-6579, nancy@cascadehorse-
shows.com, www.cascadehorseshows.
com
23-25 Inavale Farm Horse Trials, Philomath, OR.
Contact: Linda Newman Yost, (541) 929-
6860, hoofprints@inavalefarm.com, www.
inavale.com
23 -25 Whidbey Equestrian Center "Benet" Dres-
sage, Coupeville, WA. Contact: Marinea
St.Amand, (360) 678-8860, mari@ridewec.
com
23-25 Arrowhead H.T. | Billings, MT. Open Date:
May 09| Close Date: Jun 06. www.wareld-
park.org
25 Oswego Classic HJ Schooling Show, Lake
Oswego Hunt. Contact: Janice Weis:
weisjl@msn.com or 503-961-2103. www.
lakeoswegohunt.com for entry form.
July 2017
5 Team NW Summer One Day, Wilsonville,
OR. Contact: Mollie Gallaway Main - 541-
342-5432/Fax 541-685-9088; Mollie - 541-
914-0052 ; triplerise@earthlink.net, www.
teamnw.com
6-9 Country Classic Preview - Contact: Mol-
lie Gallaway Main - 541-342-5432/Fax
541-685-9088; Mollie - 541-914-0052 ;
triplerise@earthlink.net, www.teamnw.
com
7-9 Champagne Classic, Crystal – 2 days and
Magnum – 1 day. Presented by Equestri-
ans Institute at Donida Farm Equestrian
Center, Auburn, WA. Contact Markay Kerr
253-381-7349, markaymgr71@gmail.com
or see Equestrians Institute at einw.org/
pageDressage.
7-9 40th Annual Whidbey Island H.T. Open
Date: May 23, | Close Date: Jun 20. www.
whidbeyhorsetrials.org
8 Lower Puget Sounds Dressage Club Show.
Venue: Chalice Farms, Port Orchard, WA.
Website at www.lpsdc.com. Shows can
be entered online within 30 days of the
show.
9 Ride and Review with Debbie Spence.
Venue: Chalice Farms, Port Orchard, WA.
Website at www.lpsdc.com.
9 Whidbey Equestrian Center "July Seria-
tim" Dressage, Coupeville, WA. Contact:
Marinea St.Amand, (360) 678-8860, mari@
ridewec.com
12-16 The NEW Country Classic - Contact: Mol-
lie Gallaway Main - 541-342-5432/Fax
541-685-9088; Mollie - 541-914-0052 ;
triplerise@earthlink.net, www.teamnw.
com
12-16 Pacic Crest Open, Cle Elum, WA. Contact:
Barbara Baierle, (253) 350-6579, nancy@
cascadehorseshows.com, www.cascade-
horseshows.com
15 18th Annual Spokane Sport Horse Casual
Qualier I, Dessage, Spokane, WA. Contact:
Christel Carlson, (509) 993-6786, ccarlson@
spokanesporthorse.com, www.spokane-
sprthorse.com
16 10th Annual Spokane Sport Horse Ca-
sual Qualier II, Dessage, Spokane, WA.
Contact: Christel Carlson, (509) 993-6786,
ccarlson@spokanesporthorse.com, www.
spokanesprthorse.com
19-23 Oregon High Desert Classic I, Bend OR.
Contact: Diane Johnson, (425) 823-2802,
DIANJNSN@aol.com, www.jbarj.org
19-23 Event at Rebecca Farm, Open Date: Jun 6|
Close Date: Jul 4. www.rebeccafarm.org
21-22 Dressage at DevonWood I, Sherwood,
OR. Contact: Evin Rattner, (888) 329-3932
, oce@devonwoodec.com
23 Dressage at DevonWood II, Sherwood,
OR. Contact: Evin Rattner, (888) 329-3932
, oce@devonwoodec.com
26-30 Oregon High Desert Classic II, Bend OR.
Contact: Diane Johnson, (425) 823-2802,
DIANJNSN@aol.com, www.jbarj.org
August 2017
5 Summervale Spring Dressage Festival
I, Roy, WA. Contact: Paula Helm, (425)
457-1105, paula.helm@gmail.com, www.
summervalepremierdressage.com
6 Summervale Spring Dressage Festival
II, Roy, WA. Contact: Paula Helm, (425)
457-1105, paula.helm@gmail.com, www.
summervalepremierdressage.com
11 Whidbey Equestrian Center One Day Dres-
sage, Coupeville, WA. Contact: Marinea
St.Amand, (360) 678-8860, mari@ridewec.
com
11-13 Young Riders Benet HT, Centralia, WA.
Contact: Anni Grandia, (253) 225-3672,
youngridersvii@hotmail.com, www.
areavii.org
11-13 Stanton Farms H.T. Idaho. Open Date: Jun
27| Close Date: Jul 25. www.stantonfarm.
com
12 12th Annual Spokane Spor t Horse Breeders
Classic, Spokane, WA. Contact: Christel
Carlson, (509) 993-6786, ccarlson@spo-
kanesporthorse.com, www.spokanesprt-
horse.com
12 22nd Annual Spokane SportHorse Dres-
sage Spectacular I, Spokane, WA. Contact:
Christel Carlson, (509) 993-6786, ccarlson@
spokanesporthorse.com, www.spokane-
sprthorse.com
12-13 Area VII Young Rider Benet H.T. Open
Date: Jun 27 | Close Date: Jul 25. www.
areavii.org
12-13 Lower Puget Sounds Dressage Club Show.
Venue: Bainbridge Island Dressage Club
(tentative). Bainbridge Island, WA. Website
at www.lpsdc.com. Shows can be entered
online within 30 days of the show.
12-13 Whidbey Equestrian Center Summer Dres-
sage, Coupeville, WA. Contact: Marinea
St.Amand, (360) 678-8860, mari@ridewec.
com
2017 Event Dates
Page 96
January 2016
13 22nd Annual Spokane SportHorse Dres-
sage Spectacular II, Spokane, WA. Contact:
Christel Carlson, (509) 993-6786, ccarlson@
spokanesporthorse.com, www.spokane-
sporthorse.com
13 Summer Fun HJ Schooling Show, Lake
Oswego Hunt. Contact: Janice Weis:
weisjl@msn.com or 503-961-2103. www.
lakeoswegohunt.com for entry form.
12-16 Alpine Preview, Washington State Horse
Park, Cle Elum, WA. Contact: Barbara Baier-
le, (253) 350-6579, nancy@cascadehorse-
shows.com, www.cascadehorseshows.
com
18 Meadow Wood Dressage Finale I, Bonnie
Hammond, (425) 330-2950, meadowwoo-
dec@gmail.com, www.meadowwoodec.
com
19 Meadow Wood Dressage Finale II, Bonnie
Hammond, (425) 330-2950, meadowwoo-
dec@gmail.com, www.meadowwoodec.
com
24-27 Oregon Summer - Contact: Mollie Gall-
away Main - 541-342-5432/Fax 541-685-
9088; Mollie - 541-914-0052 ; triplerise@
earthlink.net, www.teamnw.com
25 Whidbey Equestrian Center One More
Time Dressage, Coupeville, WA. Contact:
Marinea St.Amand, (360) 678-8860, mari@
ridewec.com
25-27 Caber Farm Horse Trial. Open Date: Jul 11 |
Close Date: Aug 08. www.caberfarm.com
26-27 Whidbey Equestrian Center Summers
End Dressage, Coupeville, WA. Contact:
Marinea St.Amand, (360) 678-8860, mari@
ridewec.com
30-3 NW Specctacular - Contact: Mollie Gall-
away Main - 541-342-5432/Fax 541-685-
9088; Mollie - 541-914-0052 ; triplerise@
earthlink.net, www.teamnw.com
September 2017
3 Lower Puget Sounds Dressage Club Show.
Venue: Kitsap Saddle Club (tentative) Port
Orchard, WA. Website at www.lpsdc.com.
Shows can be entered online within 30
days of the show.
8-10 Aspen Farms H.T. Open Date: Jul 25 | Close
Date: Aug 22. www.aspenfarmseventing.
com
9-10 Octoberfest Hunter Jumper Show, Auburn,
WA. Contact: Barbara Baierle, (253) 350-
6579, nancy@cascadehorseshows.com,
www.cascadehorseshows.com
16 9th Annual Nancy Wild Medal Finals, Lake
Oswego Hunt (for qualied riders/ride in
Nancy Wild Classes at LOH, Quarry Ridge,
Arbor Grove and Quiet Rein to earn points)
Contact: Janice Weis: weisjl@msn.com or
503-961-2103 , www.lakeoswegohunt.
com for entry form.
22-24 Equestrians Institute H.T.. Open Date: Jul
25 | Close Date: Aug 22. www.einw.org
28-1 Spokane Sport Horse Farm Fall H.T. Open
Date: Aug 15| Close Date: Sep 12. www.
spokanesporthorse.com
October 2017
7 Quarry Ridge Friendship Series Hunt-
er-Jumper Show. Contact: Julia Rich-
ard www.quarryridgefarm.com or
juliacookrichard@gmail.com or 360-909-
8605
21-22 Anne Gribbons Clinic, Equestrians Institute
Dressage Clinic Series Part III. Contact
Gunn Cooper, EI Dressage Director. 206-
890-3198 or dressage@einw.org. Location
TBD
Anja Swenson
NW Rep for Custom Saddlery
Demo Rides & Sales
—Dressage & Jumping Saddles—
INDEPENDENT
SADDLE FITTER
Re-ocking, Billets replaced,
Tree adjustments
On site work on most brands.